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Question
Posted by: Purple | 2012/08/13

Various

Hi CS,

If someone makes a serious attempt at suicide and by luck really, their life is saved and they are admitted to hospital by paramedics via casualty, is it compulsory for them to get psychiatric treatment, or does this depend on hospital policy. Can the person refuse treatment? Will the family just be left to flounder and deal with it themselves?

We''re in this situation and I''m not sure what help we need to seek. I know that a psychiatrist who does CBT will be most helpful, but not sure if we will get this. There is much family support and love, but none of us are professionals in this field.

Thanks.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Hi P,
I think it depends on hospital or local policy, though this is one areas where I think firm national policy is needed. In Britain, at least when I worked there, it was firm policy that ANYONE admitted to hospital following any episode of self-harm, MUST be seen and evaluated by a psychiatrist before discharge.
Whichever doctor is in charge of the case ( and there must be one ) is entitled to get firther assessments and, if he/she believes that the person is a significant risk to themselves, but is reluctant to accept further treatment, can go through prescriebd procedures to institute comp[ulsory hospital admission for further assessment and potentially for treatment.
Of course families ought not to be left to flounder, though this is indeed too often the case. CBT is of course useful, but other treatments, too, may be needed in the acute stage.

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3
Our users say:
Posted by: Purple | 2012/08/13

Private.

Thanks so much CS.

Reply to Purple
Posted by: Maria | 2012/08/13

Purple, public or private health care?

Reply to Maria
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012/08/13

Hi P,
I think it depends on hospital or local policy, though this is one areas where I think firm national policy is needed. In Britain, at least when I worked there, it was firm policy that ANYONE admitted to hospital following any episode of self-harm, MUST be seen and evaluated by a psychiatrist before discharge.
Whichever doctor is in charge of the case ( and there must be one ) is entitled to get firther assessments and, if he/she believes that the person is a significant risk to themselves, but is reluctant to accept further treatment, can go through prescriebd procedures to institute comp[ulsory hospital admission for further assessment and potentially for treatment.
Of course families ought not to be left to flounder, though this is indeed too often the case. CBT is of course useful, but other treatments, too, may be needed in the acute stage.

Reply to cybershrink

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