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Question
Posted by: B | 2012/09/25

Truth

They say my bipolar is like having diabetes, how do they know this?
I can''t be sick with this thing in my head for the rest of my life, I can''t live the rest of my life how I am living it now. The pain is relentless.

How will i ever not be terrified of whats in my head? They say through learning about it, that makes me more afraid. I do not want to let the people around me down, I do not want to be the problem they have to help, try fix, support and love. Its not fair.

I''m not strong enough.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

What they mean ( and indeed they know this well from having studied what happened to many thousands of people with similar problems ) is that a potential for Bipolar episodes tends to stay with you through life. Medication and other interventions may make the episodes happen less often, and be less severe, and help you, especially if you colaborate in the treatment, manage to cope well with them and minimise their disruptions.
What this does NOT mean, is relentless pain ; the psychological pain can be reduced and avoided for lengthy periods.
You can learn to be stronger, to handle this problem well, so you can be proud of yourself and others can be proud of you. You can probabluy lead an essentially normal life.
Make certain you are assessed and treated by a good experienced specialist psychiatrist, and discuss your concerns and fears with him / her.
Yes there are times when one feels tired, but the effort is worth it, because YOU are worth it.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

5
Our users say:
Posted by: Deeve | 2012/09/26

Hey B, I''m also Bi-Polar. Maybe I''ve been lucky, I don''t know, but my meds have only been changed a few times or the dosage altered in a good 12 years now. I have read up and done a lot of Internet searching - not OVER diagnosed what I have, but slowly taken ownership of this chronic illness. It does NOT consume me, though it does appear to at times, but I manage it as best I can. What I do know is how my actions affect others around me. It is bloody difficult for my partner to live with me at times. I talk about this with him, I have a deep understanding of how things are...thats why I know it''s not only THEM that know, it''s also ME that knows!! ''Cause I know, I take ownership, I religously take my meds, I figure, I take time out breaks, I slow down, I use my own taught methods to get by...and so can you. And no, not all days are perfect...but then we have an illness, and like all illnesses, in a while you feel better, and you get going again!. Somehow you sound very down....and I agree too that it appears your meds are not working. Go back and see the quack, they can do something better for you. Best of luck...

Reply to Deeve
Posted by: Liza | 2012/09/26

I know exactly how you feel. I was there some years ago. It''s really difficult to accept that you have a illness that you''ll probably need to use medication for, for the rest of your life. What you seem to believe is that it''s all in the ''head'' - i.e. you just need to change the way you think. CBT-style therapy can help you change the way you think, but with bipolar you need the meds as well to reduce the effect of the mood swings.

As for the physical pain - you do know it could actually be caused by the stressful situation you find yourself in? The harder you ''fight'' to do the right thing, the more you stress and this is why the pain becomes unbearable. You need to stop fighting the fact that you''re not perfectly healthy. It''s not the end of the world if you have to take medication every day. Millions all over the world do it.

What you can do is take control. Ensure that you don''t skip your meds. Ensure that you see your psychiatrist regularly and tell him/her immediately when things start to go wrong or when meds don''t seem to be working. (Because honestly, it sounds like your meds aren''t working properly) I know it''s a really hard to try medication after medication until you find the ones that work best for you, but if you keep trying you will eventually find the right combination - It took me 8 years to get it right to the point where I''m almost symptom-free.

Good Luck
Liza

Reply to Liza
Posted by: B | 2012/09/25

Sorry, I didn''t mean to say its not fair, I''m not like that. I have a pain in my head thats driving me crazy.
Yes, my bipolar is diagnosed, and I am on medication and do have a psychiatrist. The tablets only last a while then I have to change again, like now. I do therapy as well, and really try but I battle to keep things on track. The harder I fight to do the right things the more the physical pain becomes.

I''m sorry, I''m really really tired

Reply to B
Posted by: Maria | 2012/09/25

B, they know this because of treating many people with bipolar. But there is good news. I know a couple of people with bipolar and with the correct medication and support from a psychologist when needed they lead absolutely normal lives. Was your bipolar diagnosed and are you currently being treated by a psychiatrist.

It isn''t fair that some of us have mental illnesses. It isn''t fair that some people live healthy lives and then get cancer or heart disease anyway. Life isn''t fair.

Take care.

Reply to Maria
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012/09/25

What they mean ( and indeed they know this well from having studied what happened to many thousands of people with similar problems ) is that a potential for Bipolar episodes tends to stay with you through life. Medication and other interventions may make the episodes happen less often, and be less severe, and help you, especially if you colaborate in the treatment, manage to cope well with them and minimise their disruptions.
What this does NOT mean, is relentless pain ; the psychological pain can be reduced and avoided for lengthy periods.
You can learn to be stronger, to handle this problem well, so you can be proud of yourself and others can be proud of you. You can probabluy lead an essentially normal life.
Make certain you are assessed and treated by a good experienced specialist psychiatrist, and discuss your concerns and fears with him / her.
Yes there are times when one feels tired, but the effort is worth it, because YOU are worth it.

Reply to cybershrink

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