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Question
Posted by: SHARON | 2010-06-08

TOOTH

Hi

My cross alsation , now 4 years old - his bottom long tooth , seems to be going a purplish colour , he doesn''t seem to be in any pain , I have flicked him on the tooth to see if he reacts , but he doesn,t , what I need to know is should we have it pulled , and how do we go about doing that , how will I know when it is bad???

Thanks

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberVet

Hi Sharon

Chewing hard objects often results in tooth injury. This can result in the pulp of the tooth to become inflammed or bleeding - results in the pink colour of the teeth often called pulpitus. Sometimes the tooth will return to its normal colour but most often the tooth can turn purple because the blood gets trapped within the dentin. This can also be a source of bacterial infection which could potentially lead to other problems.
Your options are to remove the source of trauma and get the teeth examined by your veterinary surgeon. Your local veterinary surgeon will be able to advise you as to what your options are.

Options available: Leave alone, Root canal therapy, Extraction, Restoration, Crown therapy, Dentinal sealing with radiographic monitoring.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: CyberVet | 2010-06-08

Hi Sharon

Chewing hard objects often results in tooth injury. This can result in the pulp of the tooth to become inflammed or bleeding - results in the pink colour of the teeth often called pulpitus. Sometimes the tooth will return to its normal colour but most often the tooth can turn purple because the blood gets trapped within the dentin. This can also be a source of bacterial infection which could potentially lead to other problems.
Your options are to remove the source of trauma and get the teeth examined by your veterinary surgeon. Your local veterinary surgeon will be able to advise you as to what your options are.

Options available: Leave alone, Root canal therapy, Extraction, Restoration, Crown therapy, Dentinal sealing with radiographic monitoring.

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