advertisement
Question
Posted by: Jenna | 2010/06/08

The flu and suicide

Yes an interesting subject. Deliberate. I found that since having a medical problem and having to see various specialists that during the taking of my history all was well until I stated that my parent committed suicide when I was in matric. I am a lady over 40 and have fought against the prejudice (with all due respect) that the medical profession seems to hone in on. Is it a given that if a parent took themselves out that the kids will automatically follow suit? Like it is catchy like the flu??? The specialists kind of blanked out after that and several referred me to a psychiatrist. The problem is physical and I do realise that there are hereditary factors when it comes to mental conditions, but seriously do they always have to have an AH-HA moment like this must be it???When it is not???The stigma is created by the medical profession that is what I say. Having experienced it first hand you understand. Time for things to change. I also grew up in a totally dysfunctional and abusive family. I am non-violent and never had any desire to abuse anyone at all.

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Oddly, as the flu is asociated at times with depression, it might have some small association with suicide. Obviiously, though, people should not hold such prejudices or biases. Depression is partly inherited - so your chances of developing it within your lifetime is higher than someone in whose family nobody was ever depressed, but its still most likely that you won't develop depression. And among depressed people, the risk of suicide is indeed higher in someone if a parent or blood relative committed suicide, but again, it is still uncommon, just a somewhat above average risk.
Of course training in psychiatry was limited during the training of most other specialists, so they may not be very well able to feel confident identifying and assesing such problems.
Depression can be sneaky and not obvious, and can complicate other physical illnesses, amplifying pain from any cause, for instance. Sometimes there's both a medical condition and a depression deserving attention.
I get the impression from your message that you may have some physical symptoms for which various doctors have not been finding a clear explanation, and are annoyed when they try to refer you to a psychiatrist, as this feels to you as though they are not taking your initial complaints seriously, and are suggesting it's "all in your mind" Actually, as a psychiatrist is also a fully trained medical doctor, he is sometimes well placed to recognize physical problems, because he can take into account and set to one side psychological elements as well.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/06/08

Oddly, as the flu is asociated at times with depression, it might have some small association with suicide. Obviiously, though, people should not hold such prejudices or biases. Depression is partly inherited - so your chances of developing it within your lifetime is higher than someone in whose family nobody was ever depressed, but its still most likely that you won't develop depression. And among depressed people, the risk of suicide is indeed higher in someone if a parent or blood relative committed suicide, but again, it is still uncommon, just a somewhat above average risk.
Of course training in psychiatry was limited during the training of most other specialists, so they may not be very well able to feel confident identifying and assesing such problems.
Depression can be sneaky and not obvious, and can complicate other physical illnesses, amplifying pain from any cause, for instance. Sometimes there's both a medical condition and a depression deserving attention.
I get the impression from your message that you may have some physical symptoms for which various doctors have not been finding a clear explanation, and are annoyed when they try to refer you to a psychiatrist, as this feels to you as though they are not taking your initial complaints seriously, and are suggesting it's "all in your mind" Actually, as a psychiatrist is also a fully trained medical doctor, he is sometimes well placed to recognize physical problems, because he can take into account and set to one side psychological elements as well.

Reply to cybershrink

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement