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Question
Posted by: Andre Venter | 2012-07-06

Stop Smoking

Thank you for the time line on withdrawing symptoms regarding the above. I''ve tried different methods including Allen Carr''s method. I ''m smoking between 50 and 60 cigarettes per day. Most of them suggest that the time line is about 21 to 30 days so this sound to me more realistic lokking at a longer time line. I''ve stopped for two weeks and the withdrawing became just worst after 10 days and by day 14 I became seriously depressed and started again.Unfortunately a anxiety/depression disorder have been diagnose many years ago. The psychiatrist and other experts believe that my condition is biologically and inherited.

Is it possible for me to stop and should I perhaps try to look at a longer period of withdrawing. I''m sure that people with this condition find it much harder to cope without smoking. Are you aware of any success stories with people with my type of profile? I''m 60 years old.

Regards

Andre Venter

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageStop Smoking Advice

I think many people with mood/anxiety disorders use smoking as an attempt to "self-medicate", and there's a vicious cycle effect, because smoking actually worsens anxiety symptoms (really) and, because it damages your health overall, it raises risk for depression, which is closely linked to aspects of physical health. As your doctors say - depression has a biological basis. I also agree that it is very hard for anyone with a mood disorder to give up whatever may make them feel a little better in the moment - even if it's bad for them in the long run. But there are indeed many cases of people with your medical background who have successfully stopped using cigarettes or other damaging substances. Don't beat yourself up about quitting and then starting again. Most successful quitters had several tries before they quit for good. The important thing is not to give up trying!

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: Stop Smoking Advice | 2012-07-14

I think many people with mood/anxiety disorders use smoking as an attempt to "self-medicate", and there's a vicious cycle effect, because smoking actually worsens anxiety symptoms (really) and, because it damages your health overall, it raises risk for depression, which is closely linked to aspects of physical health. As your doctors say - depression has a biological basis. I also agree that it is very hard for anyone with a mood disorder to give up whatever may make them feel a little better in the moment - even if it's bad for them in the long run. But there are indeed many cases of people with your medical background who have successfully stopped using cigarettes or other damaging substances. Don't beat yourself up about quitting and then starting again. Most successful quitters had several tries before they quit for good. The important thing is not to give up trying!

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