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Question
Posted by: mom | 2010/05/04

sti

just like know if my daughter has sti and, if she has an sti must her boyfriend have it too? How can you detect whether she's got it?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageSexologist

How old is your daughter? I am wondering why it is you that is asking and not her?

STI's can be symptomatic - signs such as yellow/green and sometimes smelly discharge, pain in the lower abdomen and back, pain during intercourse, warts or ulcers around the vulva. Be aware that some of these 'signs' may also be something other than an STI too - eg. thrush may be sexually transmitted or due to an imbalance in the natural bacteria of the genital area.
STI's may also be unsymptomatic, in otherwords, there may be no obvious signs. To answer your question about 'detecting' an STI in your daughter, I would encourage you not to unless she brings such concerns to you. If you are aware or suspect that she is sexually active, I would encourage you to educate her (or go with her so you both can learn) about STI's and how to keep safe etc. SExual activity should be private and I would argue that unless the child is underage, parents should allow their adult child such rights of privacy and support them as appropriate.

If your daughter has an STI, it does not necessarily mean that her boyfriend does. If they are having unprotected sex, then there is a good chance of him having it too, yes. But this is not necessarily the case...

Claire
SASHA

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

3
Our users say:
Posted by: thubalethu. | 2010/05/12

I would like to know more about sti. could one develope sti without any contacts with someone who has it? if so what causes sti in ones body?

Reply to thubalethu.
Posted by: Sexologist | 2010/05/05

How old is your daughter? I am wondering why it is you that is asking and not her?

STI's can be symptomatic - signs such as yellow/green and sometimes smelly discharge, pain in the lower abdomen and back, pain during intercourse, warts or ulcers around the vulva. Be aware that some of these 'signs' may also be something other than an STI too - eg. thrush may be sexually transmitted or due to an imbalance in the natural bacteria of the genital area.
STI's may also be unsymptomatic, in otherwords, there may be no obvious signs. To answer your question about 'detecting' an STI in your daughter, I would encourage you not to unless she brings such concerns to you. If you are aware or suspect that she is sexually active, I would encourage you to educate her (or go with her so you both can learn) about STI's and how to keep safe etc. SExual activity should be private and I would argue that unless the child is underage, parents should allow their adult child such rights of privacy and support them as appropriate.

If your daughter has an STI, it does not necessarily mean that her boyfriend does. If they are having unprotected sex, then there is a good chance of him having it too, yes. But this is not necessarily the case...

Claire
SASHA

Reply to Sexologist
Posted by: simone | 2010/05/04

Fortunately, you have a few different types of health care providers to choose from if you think that you might have been exposed to a sexually transmitted infection (STI), the newer term for a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Women may go to a gynecologist or another women''s health care provider, and men to a urologist or another men''s health care provider.
Some people feel embarrassed visiting a health care provider when they think they may have an STI, so you might want to consider how comfortable you''ll feel with certain health care providers during the process of deciding who to see. Will you be able to speak openly? If you are concerned about being able to be open with your regular health care provider, you might consider visiting a health center such as Planned Parenthood. It''s important to tell the health care provider that you think you may have an STI, and be honest about what you have been exposed to. Many providers don''t automatically test for STIs during a routine check-up —  typically you would need to either tell them what you are concerned about, or show them any symptoms you''ve noticed.
A blood test can identify the following STIs (sexually transmitted infections): HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis, and herpes. Sexually active people may also want to get tested for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Testing for chlamydia and gonorrhea often involves a urine analysis, and can also be done by swabbing areas likely to be infected, including the cervix, urethra, anus, and throat.



Reply to simone

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