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Question
Posted by: vicky | 2011/02/16

state hospitals

hi CS
hope your valentine''s week is passing as uneventful as mine, and that you''re well and everything.

what is your opinion on state psychiatric hospitals for the treatment of say severe depression? don''t you think that being locked up with psychotic patients would actually be counter productive in that it would make any normal person feel down, never mind if you''re already prone to depression? what''s the reason behind taking away all rights of a person? have you ever worked in any such facility, maybe when you were still studying? can you remember what your impressions were at the time?

keep well!

vicky

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Partly well, mainly everything !
I can't really generalize about state hospitals, which vary not only between hospitals, but between departments and wards. There are some I wouldn't let even my worst enemy go to, and some that try hard and do pretty well. And even then it depends on the particular doctor, the group of nurses, and so on.
And there should be few if any locked wards. In fact, it'd be illegal for them to lock up any patients at all without very specific reasons and having gone through particular legally required procedures, open to review. They shouldn't take away ANY of the rights of a normal person, and they could be sued if they did so.
I think you may be mistakenly thinking of the procedures which should be really rarely used, for compulsory admission, used when someone is seriously considered to be a significant danger to himself or others, and where that person refuses to go to hospital voluntarily or to have needed treatment. This doesn't apply to the vast majority of patients
When I was a student in Britain, I spent time in some of the classic old Asylums, and they were often rather nice, in some ways. The original idea of Asylum was a place of safety and peace. They were all in large grounds with loads of grass and trees, because it was believed to be useful for one's mental health to be somewhere with pleasant views. The food seemed quite good ( but then as students we were always hungry ). And there was quite a lot of art therapy and ocupational therapy available, which I found enjoyable.

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3
Our users say:
Posted by: Zet | 2011/02/17

State Hospitals SUCK !! No personal care, facilities bad, staff mostly dont care.
Private health is the way to go.

Reply to Zet
Posted by: Obvious | 2011/02/16

State hospitals are great, that''s why private health care has never really taken off!

Reply to Obvious
Posted by: cybershrink | 2011/02/16

Partly well, mainly everything !
I can't really generalize about state hospitals, which vary not only between hospitals, but between departments and wards. There are some I wouldn't let even my worst enemy go to, and some that try hard and do pretty well. And even then it depends on the particular doctor, the group of nurses, and so on.
And there should be few if any locked wards. In fact, it'd be illegal for them to lock up any patients at all without very specific reasons and having gone through particular legally required procedures, open to review. They shouldn't take away ANY of the rights of a normal person, and they could be sued if they did so.
I think you may be mistakenly thinking of the procedures which should be really rarely used, for compulsory admission, used when someone is seriously considered to be a significant danger to himself or others, and where that person refuses to go to hospital voluntarily or to have needed treatment. This doesn't apply to the vast majority of patients
When I was a student in Britain, I spent time in some of the classic old Asylums, and they were often rather nice, in some ways. The original idea of Asylum was a place of safety and peace. They were all in large grounds with loads of grass and trees, because it was believed to be useful for one's mental health to be somewhere with pleasant views. The food seemed quite good ( but then as students we were always hungry ). And there was quite a lot of art therapy and ocupational therapy available, which I found enjoyable.

Reply to cybershrink

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