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Question
Posted by: Niini | 2010/10/23

Sperm morphology

We have been trying to conceive for almost a year now. My husband has recently been diagnosed with an infected prostate. He also has bad sperm morphology and viscosity, which the doc says is due to the infected prostate. He is now on antibiotics for the infection.

My concern is that his prostate could not have been infected for the entire year - so why are we not conceiving? Could his sperm problems be caused by something else? What are the chances of the antibiotics clearing up the infection and this in turn resulting in normal sperm?
What are our other alternatives?
Thanks






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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFertility expert

Dear Niini

You are quite right in that the sperm morphology problem is just part of the bigger scenario of possibilities. If the morphology percentage is on the borderline i.e. around about 7% or higher, then treating the infection may well improve fertility either for natural intercourse or intrauterine inseminations. However if the percentage is significantly low then treating the infection may not change the outcome dramatically and therefore assisted reproduction such as invitro fertilisation (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) may be necessary.

Answered by: Dr M.I. Cassim

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: Fertility expert | 2010/10/29

Dear Niini

You are quite right in that the sperm morphology problem is just part of the bigger scenario of possibilities. If the morphology percentage is on the borderline i.e. around about 7% or higher, then treating the infection may well improve fertility either for natural intercourse or intrauterine inseminations. However if the percentage is significantly low then treating the infection may not change the outcome dramatically and therefore assisted reproduction such as invitro fertilisation (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) may be necessary.

Answered by: Dr M.I. Cassim

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