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Question
Posted by: Anon | 2010/08/03

Sore Quads

What are the main contributors to sore quads after a marathon and during, and what is the best to help prevent and cure this?
Thank you

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFitnessDoc

Hi Anon

The pain is caused by very tiny, microscopic tears in the muscle, as a result of doing exercise that your muscles are unaccustomed to. The marathon involves thousands of muscle impacts and contractions, and each one damages the fibers slightly. The same happens any time you take up a new sport, or try a new activity, you can expect to feel some pain. So that’s the good news – well, it’s good news in that what you feel is nothing unusual, it’s actually expected.

It doesn’t of course help right now and the only thing that will help that is some rest and a bit of control around how you train. Remember, the cause is training beyond what your muscle can handle and so the solution is to build the programme gradually rather than to jump in at a high level. Once it happens, you don't "cure" it as much as you wait for the pain to subside. Running a marathon takes time to recover from and so it's no surprise that you have pain - you just need to allow the body to heal afterwards, and that takes a week or two, and then you run again.

Good luck

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: fitnessdoc | 2010/08/06

Hi Anon

The pain is caused by very tiny, microscopic tears in the muscle, as a result of doing exercise that your muscles are unaccustomed to. The marathon involves thousands of muscle impacts and contractions, and each one damages the fibers slightly. The same happens any time you take up a new sport, or try a new activity, you can expect to feel some pain. So that’s the good news – well, it’s good news in that what you feel is nothing unusual, it’s actually expected.

It doesn’t of course help right now and the only thing that will help that is some rest and a bit of control around how you train. Remember, the cause is training beyond what your muscle can handle and so the solution is to build the programme gradually rather than to jump in at a high level. Once it happens, you don't "cure" it as much as you wait for the pain to subside. Running a marathon takes time to recover from and so it's no surprise that you have pain - you just need to allow the body to heal afterwards, and that takes a week or two, and then you run again.

Good luck

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