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Question
Posted by: CONCERNED WIFE | 2011-01-10

SOCIO-PHOBIA

Hi Doc. Here''s wishing you all the best for 2011

Firstly to give you some feedback. My daugher (diagnosed with Post Natal Pshycosis) is doing really very well. She outwardly appears to have recovered 100%, although I know there is still a road to be walked.

My hubby, diagnosed with depression and Adult ADHD is also doing much better - and he recognises this because he says that the last time he recalls feeling the way he is currently feeling was when he was a little boy, however, I am concerned about a statement he made recently. He was also diagnosed with Social Anxiety / Socio-Phobia. His pshyciatrist has recommended that he attends some classes to learn how to interact with people, but he tells me he''s too old (52) to learn or to change.

How can I gently convince him that he is wrong and does need these classes to learn the skills. His socio-phobia has resulted in me being very lonely as we have absolutely no friends. He''s happy to have none, while I feel like I am dying a slow death as I love having people around me. I do have some friends, or rather let me call them aquiaintences, of my own, but would love for us to have friends as a couple so we can do things together. I''m tired of being single in a marraige, as I always have to go to events on my own.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Thanks for the feed-back - it's always appreciated ! Sounds like they're both doing really well, except for the hiccough about the social phobia, Sounds like your husband is making the commonly msitaken assumption about being too old to learn. I'm significantly older than him, and I'm still learning every day.
Remind him that it was difficult for him, at first, to believe that his depression, etc., could be helped and yet it has been dramatically improved. So it will be with the social phobia, if he allows this to happen. Remember too, both of you, that social phobia is a nastier version of shyness, so it encourages him to feel he might look foolish in front of other people, whereas the sessions would, on the contrary, enable him to recognize that he does not look foolish in frobnt of others, and that he could handle this even if it did happen

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2011-01-10

Thanks for the feed-back - it's always appreciated ! Sounds like they're both doing really well, except for the hiccough about the social phobia, Sounds like your husband is making the commonly msitaken assumption about being too old to learn. I'm significantly older than him, and I'm still learning every day.
Remind him that it was difficult for him, at first, to believe that his depression, etc., could be helped and yet it has been dramatically improved. So it will be with the social phobia, if he allows this to happen. Remember too, both of you, that social phobia is a nastier version of shyness, so it encourages him to feel he might look foolish in front of other people, whereas the sessions would, on the contrary, enable him to recognize that he does not look foolish in frobnt of others, and that he could handle this even if it did happen

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