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Question
Posted by: maria | 2012/03/12

S.L.E

I am a counselor at a school and recently saw a 18 year old girl who was diagnosed with S.L.E 4 years ago. she takes medication for it everyday, but does not really know what the disease is. I do not know either. She has recently gained a lot of weight, she does not know whether there are food she must avoid or food that can help her condition, she also does not know what exercises she can do because her joints pain. She is really unhappy with her condition and herself and I just want to help her. She is in matric and wants to look good for the matric dance, but she is overweight and struggling with her condition. What exercise, diet and medical advice can you give me that can help her. She does not have a medical aid and cannot go and see a dietician. Any advice you can give me will be appreciated.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageDietDoc

Dear Maria
SLE is an auto-immune disease that is capable of affecting every system in the human body. If your pupil is receiving treatment which may include corticosteroids and other potent drugs, this can affect her metabolism and body weight. There is, however, no general diet that is prescribed for patients with SLE because the dietary needs of each patient are different depending on what manifestation of SLE they suffer from, how serious their condition is, what drugs are being used to treat the SLE and if they are experiencing a so-called 'flare-up' of their condition or not. If the lassie is being treated at a government hospital then she should ask the doctors if she can be referred to the obesity clinic at the hospital, as this is probably the only place where she could obtain free dietetic advice.
As regards exercise, she should try doing very gentle exercise such as going for a slow walk for a short distance without straining her joints or if by any chance she has access to a swimming pool, then swimming is a potential option which would also not put strain on her joints.
This is a situation where the patient should be receiving dietary advice and guidance as part of her treatment on an ongoing basis so that her food intake can be tailored to her condition as it changes over time. This is unfortunately not a situation where general dietary advice is of use.
Best regards
DietDoc

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: Maybe | 2012/03/13

Maybe she can swim for exercise - I think it does not exert pressure on the joints. And it works out the whole body.

Reply to Maybe
Posted by: DietDoc | 2012/03/13

Dear Maria
SLE is an auto-immune disease that is capable of affecting every system in the human body. If your pupil is receiving treatment which may include corticosteroids and other potent drugs, this can affect her metabolism and body weight. There is, however, no general diet that is prescribed for patients with SLE because the dietary needs of each patient are different depending on what manifestation of SLE they suffer from, how serious their condition is, what drugs are being used to treat the SLE and if they are experiencing a so-called 'flare-up' of their condition or not. If the lassie is being treated at a government hospital then she should ask the doctors if she can be referred to the obesity clinic at the hospital, as this is probably the only place where she could obtain free dietetic advice.
As regards exercise, she should try doing very gentle exercise such as going for a slow walk for a short distance without straining her joints or if by any chance she has access to a swimming pool, then swimming is a potential option which would also not put strain on her joints.
This is a situation where the patient should be receiving dietary advice and guidance as part of her treatment on an ongoing basis so that her food intake can be tailored to her condition as it changes over time. This is unfortunately not a situation where general dietary advice is of use.
Best regards
DietDoc

Reply to DietDoc

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