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Question
Posted by: Pierre (40y) | 2009/11/25

Sick of training

Hi there,
I always hear how good training is for your general health but my body reacts in a negative way:
A few years ago I went to the gym for 5 years and during that time I was sick very often. I' d say almost ones every 2 months. Normally post nasal or sore throat related.
I then stopped for the last 4 years and I must say it was my healthiest years ever with only the once-a-year flu.
About 2 months ago I started cycling and true’ s-bob I had to go to the doc 3 times since then due to a sore throat!!
I' m seriously thinking of stopping all exercise again - in the name of heath :(

Your input would be valued.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFitnessDoc

Hi Pierre

I suspect that your sickness was related more to the gym, and less to the exercise. Gyms are high risk when it comes to picking up infection, because of the air-conditioning and the fact that so many people are breathing heavily in an enclosed space.

Having said that, if you are exercising hard, your immune system can be compromised, certainly, and maybe that is what happened to you. The fact that you got ill cycling may indicate this (of course, it was the middle of winter, and your sickness may have been the result of something completely separate)

So I think it depends on how hard you were training - were you overdoing it? There are studies that have found that people in high volume or intensity training are more likely to get sick. So that's one possibility. ANd it is related to diet - if you train, your diet must change, and if it doesn't, the chances of sickness are higher, so I would not consider stopping exercise, but rather changing it, and changing diet.

Specifically, you may need to start slower, build up more carefully, and then look at more carbs in the diet, and more total energy, which will hopefully help prevent illness.

Final word - there is a lot of evidence that the right volume of exercise actually improves the immune system, and so in the name of health, it's better to train, but not too hard or too much, and with the right diet!

Ross

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2
Our users say:
Posted by: Pierre | 2009/11/25

Hi Ross,

I agree with what you saying. Just almost sounds " easier"  to do nothing but just eat right - well and safer in terms of cycling accidents on the road - haha

I did not train that hard, but I also agree that each time you train you pushing your body closer to its limits and are therefore more susceptible to any infections.
I do take a multi-vitamin but will have to look at my diet as you suggested. Problem is that adding too many carbs will also have a negative effect. I need to make sure I add as close to the amount that my body is going to burn as possible.

Thanks for your input.
Pierre

Reply to Pierre
Posted by: fitnessdoc | 2009/11/25

Hi Pierre

I suspect that your sickness was related more to the gym, and less to the exercise. Gyms are high risk when it comes to picking up infection, because of the air-conditioning and the fact that so many people are breathing heavily in an enclosed space.

Having said that, if you are exercising hard, your immune system can be compromised, certainly, and maybe that is what happened to you. The fact that you got ill cycling may indicate this (of course, it was the middle of winter, and your sickness may have been the result of something completely separate)

So I think it depends on how hard you were training - were you overdoing it? There are studies that have found that people in high volume or intensity training are more likely to get sick. So that's one possibility. ANd it is related to diet - if you train, your diet must change, and if it doesn't, the chances of sickness are higher, so I would not consider stopping exercise, but rather changing it, and changing diet.

Specifically, you may need to start slower, build up more carefully, and then look at more carbs in the diet, and more total energy, which will hopefully help prevent illness.

Final word - there is a lot of evidence that the right volume of exercise actually improves the immune system, and so in the name of health, it's better to train, but not too hard or too much, and with the right diet!

Ross

Reply to fitnessdoc

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