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Question
Posted by: Judy | 2012-04-18

Should i leave my bipolar partner of 10 years ( I am losing my strength and its draining me)

I have a a bipolar partner and she is taking her tablets but when she hits her manic times she becomes viscous and very hurtful to me and our son he lands up shaking for he knows what is coming up he is 8 years old we land up holding each other tightly and crying in his room with my partner Kicking the door down she becomes violent and very scary and if i cry she orders me to stop so cos i am a cry baby and i am feeling sorry for myself this lasts for a few hours then after that, i don''t know what her triggers are i just feel or even see in her facial features that she is in that mood and who ever is in her way she goes crazy on, I love her sooooo much but i think of my son and my sanity it has come to a point that i am so depressed cos i don''t see the light at the end of the tunnel anymore. my son his a emotional wreck don''t know if he is coming or going anymore he is only eight, i try to be the buffer between him and her but when she is like that she knows our son is the only thing that will hurt me so naturally that is her target, when she is not in manic she is the most amazing person we have amazing days together as a family and she is totally amazing with our son, i have tried to talk to her regarding her manic episodes that never helps it opens the CAN off warms that triggers it , please help me my email is judysubel@live.co.za PLEASE I BEG YOU

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Bipolar Disorder ought to be able to be properly controlled by suitable medication, and I would see it as essential for the treating psychiatrist ( this should NEVER be dealt with solely by a GP ) should also make sure to hear from family members to better assess the continuing situation. The sort of violence you describe is not usually a part of manic episodes, and you should discuss this with the treating shrink, as this could indeed be damaging for the child.
This is more than ordinary manic episodes, and needs both to be re-assessed by the treating psychiatrist ( maybe some medication changes could help ) and perhaps also by a psychologist with expertise in such situations, who can help both to assess the situation and to help find better ways to control these crises. The psychologist could also help to assess the child and suggest better ways to protect and help him.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012-04-18

Bipolar Disorder ought to be able to be properly controlled by suitable medication, and I would see it as essential for the treating psychiatrist ( this should NEVER be dealt with solely by a GP ) should also make sure to hear from family members to better assess the continuing situation. The sort of violence you describe is not usually a part of manic episodes, and you should discuss this with the treating shrink, as this could indeed be damaging for the child.
This is more than ordinary manic episodes, and needs both to be re-assessed by the treating psychiatrist ( maybe some medication changes could help ) and perhaps also by a psychologist with expertise in such situations, who can help both to assess the situation and to help find better ways to control these crises. The psychologist could also help to assess the child and suggest better ways to protect and help him.

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