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Question
Posted by: Rob28 | 2010/01/09

Seroquel XR et al

Dear Doc,

I have been prescribed Seroquel XR to replace the " regular"  Seroquel 300mg. However, with all the other meds I take it seems to take FOREVER to firstly get me to sleep and then to NOT be drowsy the next day. Incidentally, I also suffer from insomnia, I can' t get to sleep without help. I' ve been on sleep meds for months now... we started on the Z' s (zolpidem etc) and ended with flunitrazepam,1mg. However, I asked to be switched to something that is " repeatable"  so I don' t have to see the Dr every month for a new script.

Basically what I want to know is how to take my meds so that they don' t interfere with my daily functioning (such as sleeping for a REALLY long time - more than 12 hours.).

Diagnosis: Bipolar type 1 (age 23)
Rx: Camcolit 800mg nocte, Epilim 500mg bd, Inderal 80mg LA mane, Noctamid 1mg, Seroquel XR 300mg XR.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

I am very sceptical about such products. It costs a lot of money for a drug company to produce and register a new drug, and in recompense they are given a period of exclusive patent when they alone can sell and profit from it. Increasingly, the big companies are too lazy or mean to invest in creating genuinely new products to replace their big money spinners as such original exclusive patents run out, and instead, they suddenly "doscover" a new minor variant on the original molecule, or a long-acting or slow-release form, over which they can now claim a newly extended period of excludivbe patent rights and continuing profits.
Not all drugs actually benefit from or need a slow-release / long-acting form.
Now, with Seroquel, it's not generally used to assist insomnia as such, but it stands to reason that if it suited you in that way when taking the original formulation, which would have produced reasonably rapid increases in the blood levels of the drug at the time you were expecting to get to sleep, the whole point of a SR or other long-acting form is to abolish that effect, and instead to have the pill release the drug only slowly and gradually, producing a smoother and more gradual release of the drug, as well as one that would be longer-lasting.
If this new formulation of the drug is not only NOT helping you get to sleep as it used to, but also leaving you more drowsy and inert the next day, then the new version is not suiting you, and you would probably be better suited by returning to the earlier form of it. I'm not sure what added bnefit your doc expected the SR version to have, so you'd need to discuss this frankly with him.

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2
Our users say:
Posted by: Liza | 2010/01/10

Perhaps go back to the ' regular'  Seroquel that wasn' t causing such problems?

Reply to Liza
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/01/10

I am very sceptical about such products. It costs a lot of money for a drug company to produce and register a new drug, and in recompense they are given a period of exclusive patent when they alone can sell and profit from it. Increasingly, the big companies are too lazy or mean to invest in creating genuinely new products to replace their big money spinners as such original exclusive patents run out, and instead, they suddenly "doscover" a new minor variant on the original molecule, or a long-acting or slow-release form, over which they can now claim a newly extended period of excludivbe patent rights and continuing profits.
Not all drugs actually benefit from or need a slow-release / long-acting form.
Now, with Seroquel, it's not generally used to assist insomnia as such, but it stands to reason that if it suited you in that way when taking the original formulation, which would have produced reasonably rapid increases in the blood levels of the drug at the time you were expecting to get to sleep, the whole point of a SR or other long-acting form is to abolish that effect, and instead to have the pill release the drug only slowly and gradually, producing a smoother and more gradual release of the drug, as well as one that would be longer-lasting.
If this new formulation of the drug is not only NOT helping you get to sleep as it used to, but also leaving you more drowsy and inert the next day, then the new version is not suiting you, and you would probably be better suited by returning to the earlier form of it. I'm not sure what added bnefit your doc expected the SR version to have, so you'd need to discuss this frankly with him.

Reply to cybershrink

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