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Question
Posted by: Nick | 2012/05/14

Seroquel

I have taken plenty of antidepressants, but have never tried one of these atypical antipsychotics, like quetiapine, what should I expect?
Does it just sedate you into a stupor of a more acceptable social compliance, or is it capable of actually making you feel good? I have been prescribed it for an anxiety disorder and not bipolar or schitzophrenia

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Its not as simple as that. The atypical antip[sychotics may have a place, in SOME situations, to help control the swings and roundabouts of Bipolar Disorder, but are hardly used to treat basic depression. No meds we use should make someone "feel good" - those that do, artificially and temporarily, tend to be addictive. Similarly, they're not meant to lull you into social compliance ( some of society's rules ought to be protested, not complied with ).
Sometimes, if there is considered to be a significant risk of the person becoming dependent on / addicted to, one of the old sedative hypnotics like those of the Valium family, a specialist might try an antipsychiatic which could calm anxiety but is unlikely to induce addiction. These are not drugs to be lightly used by any GP, though, and should only be prescribed on the recommendation of a specialist psychiatrist

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2
Our users say:
Posted by: Liza | 2012/05/15

My experience with seroquel has been great - but I''m bipolar and that might make a difference. I only drink it at night before going to sleep. It does sedate, but as long as you don''t use the XL version, the sedation doesn''t last longer than a normal sleep cycle - so you don''t have problems with drowsiness when awakening each morning. When starting Seroquel, the sedative effects are also stronger. When you''ve used it for a while, the sedative effects will reduce but not go away completely.

Good Luck
Liza

Reply to Liza
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012/05/15

Its not as simple as that. The atypical antip[sychotics may have a place, in SOME situations, to help control the swings and roundabouts of Bipolar Disorder, but are hardly used to treat basic depression. No meds we use should make someone "feel good" - those that do, artificially and temporarily, tend to be addictive. Similarly, they're not meant to lull you into social compliance ( some of society's rules ought to be protested, not complied with ).
Sometimes, if there is considered to be a significant risk of the person becoming dependent on / addicted to, one of the old sedative hypnotics like those of the Valium family, a specialist might try an antipsychiatic which could calm anxiety but is unlikely to induce addiction. These are not drugs to be lightly used by any GP, though, and should only be prescribed on the recommendation of a specialist psychiatrist

Reply to cybershrink

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