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Question
Posted by: Tiny | 2011/05/09

Scabies

Hi, we have a daschund about 5 months old.We discovered some hairlos on his head a few weeks ago and took him to our vet.He said the little guy has scabies and gave him an injection and some sulphur soap to use.After a while we noticed that it was only getting worse and he gave us ectodex dip to use, have have now dipped him twice and still isn`t getting better.He almost has no hair on his head now and his skin is flaking similiar to dandruff. I even tried garlic and no results.He itches and scratches the whole day.How will i know if it is getting better and should there be so much hairloss and will the hair grow back or will it stay bold.Please help.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberVet

Below you will find the methodology to the diagnosis and treatment of scabies. Please note that I have not given the treatment doses as you must discuss the treatment plan with your own vet.
Diagnosis of Scabies:

1) History, clinical findings and response to treatment.
2) Microscopy examination of Skin Scrapings – detect mite, nymphs, larva or ova. Note that mites can be extremely difficult to find – False +ve results are common.
3) Serology.
4) Histopathology.

Prognosis: good

Treatment:
1) Treat all in affected and in-contact dogs with a scabicide.
2) Treat for any secondary bacterial skin infection – 3-4 weeks and 1 week after the clinical sign’s have resolved
3) Topical shampoo – use an antimicrobial shampoo every 3-7 days.
4) Use effective systemic treatments
a) Selamectin (Revolution).
b) Ivermectin (Ivomec).
c) Doramectin (Dectomax).
d) Milbemycin oxime (Milbemax deworm tablets)
e) Topical Moxidectin

5) Topical treatments
a) Amitraz sol – 0.025-0.03% conc.
b) Fiprinol spray (Frontline).
c) Lime Sulphur solution.
d) Organophosphates – very toxic and poor availability.

6) If the dog is severely puritic and the mites have been identified then steroids given for the first 2-5 days.
7) Treat the environment with an effective parasiticidal and dispose of any bedding.

Important: This parasite is highly contagious and can also infest humans.

regards
Dr Campbell

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: CyberVet | 2011/05/24

Below you will find the methodology to the diagnosis and treatment of scabies. Please note that I have not given the treatment doses as you must discuss the treatment plan with your own vet.
Diagnosis of Scabies:

1) History, clinical findings and response to treatment.
2) Microscopy examination of Skin Scrapings – detect mite, nymphs, larva or ova. Note that mites can be extremely difficult to find – False +ve results are common.
3) Serology.
4) Histopathology.

Prognosis: good

Treatment:
1) Treat all in affected and in-contact dogs with a scabicide.
2) Treat for any secondary bacterial skin infection – 3-4 weeks and 1 week after the clinical sign’s have resolved
3) Topical shampoo – use an antimicrobial shampoo every 3-7 days.
4) Use effective systemic treatments
a) Selamectin (Revolution).
b) Ivermectin (Ivomec).
c) Doramectin (Dectomax).
d) Milbemycin oxime (Milbemax deworm tablets)
e) Topical Moxidectin

5) Topical treatments
a) Amitraz sol – 0.025-0.03% conc.
b) Fiprinol spray (Frontline).
c) Lime Sulphur solution.
d) Organophosphates – very toxic and poor availability.

6) If the dog is severely puritic and the mites have been identified then steroids given for the first 2-5 days.
7) Treat the environment with an effective parasiticidal and dispose of any bedding.

Important: This parasite is highly contagious and can also infest humans.

regards
Dr Campbell

Reply to CyberVet
Posted by: Chill | 2011/05/09

Scabies in dogs = mange.

If you have applied the correct treatment for a couple of weeks, the condition should be improving by now, so if it''s getting worse, then you need to go back to the vet - there are various types of mange and the treatment varies. You can''t tell just by looking - they have to take a skin scraping and look under a microscope.

Once you get the right treatment, the condition will get better, and the hair will grow back.

If your vet is stumped, request a referral to a veterinary specialist or to a vet with a special interest in dermatology.

Don''t give him garlic, it isn''t good for dogs.

Reply to Chill

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