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Question
Posted by: Anon. | 2009/11/15

Saturated Fats

I know a Biochemist, who has studied Nutrition in depth. He is about 47yrs old and in an EXCELLENT health condition. He even makes his own vitamin' s etc. I myself am a fan of the books written by Adelle Davis and so is he.
He believes saturated fats are not bad, but it is the carbohydrates consumed with the fats that make them bad. He is not a big fan of omega 3 &  6 f.a' s - although he agree' s they are essential. He consumes fats like that from coconut and cream from milk. He has not got any cholesterol problems. Hair is still dark, excellent physical shape, healthy sight etc.
I am studying Dietetics, and to be honest I do not always agree with everything we are being taught. I am however planning on qualifying then doing my own research, because I know my opinion will not be valid without some sort of " foot"  to stand on. 45% - 65% CHO, 20% - 35% fat and 15% - 25% protein.... I don' t know. Sometimes when working out a diet for someone I must add 15 exchanges of CHO to someone' s diet - I think it' s just too much! I really do not mean to criticize or offend but sometimes I really don' t understand.
Also, am I correct in thinking it matters at what time of the day a food is eaten? As in no carbohydrates at an evening meal, or doesn' t it really matter? What is your opinion about food combinations? I personaaly think the stomach acids are strong enough to usually digest the normal meal, without worring about combining protein and CHO - isn' t protein beneficial to stabilize blood glucose levels when eaten with protein?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageDietDoc

Dear Saturated Fats
Every person who studies Dietetics and Nutrition has to take his or her own decision about which approach he/she is going to use in his/her later career. I would hope that your friend the Biochemist still looks good and healthy because 47 is not old in present day terms, although I suppose that from the age of around 20 it seems like ancient! If you qualify and do your own thorough research using reputable and peer-reviewed publications and then make a decision about which approach you intend using, that will be excellent. I base my acceptance of a relatively high intake of CHO, esp those with a high-fibre intake and a low-GI on the following: a) Anthropological evidence, b) The diets eaten by primitive peoples and our own black South Africans who ate a diet high in CHO, low in fat and low in protein, and generally enjoyed good health (none of the hypertension and diabetes seen today) before these rural populations came into contact with western diets (the same applies to many other groups such as the Aborigines in Australia and the Pima Indians in the USA), c) The high CHO intake that top athletes ingest without gaining weight d) The energy content of CHO, protein and fat (e.g. 16, 17 and 37 kJ per gram respectively). I do not think that it really matters at what time of day a food is eaten, but it is a good rule to have a large breakfast, a moderate lunch and a small, light supper, or even better 6 small, healthy meals spaced over the day. Food combining does not seem necessary to me because humans are after all omnivores and our digestive systems are well suited to ingesting a mixture of macronutrients.
Good luck with your studies and your future
DietDoc

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Our users say:
Posted by: DietDoc | 2009/11/15

Dear Saturated Fats
Every person who studies Dietetics and Nutrition has to take his or her own decision about which approach he/she is going to use in his/her later career. I would hope that your friend the Biochemist still looks good and healthy because 47 is not old in present day terms, although I suppose that from the age of around 20 it seems like ancient! If you qualify and do your own thorough research using reputable and peer-reviewed publications and then make a decision about which approach you intend using, that will be excellent. I base my acceptance of a relatively high intake of CHO, esp those with a high-fibre intake and a low-GI on the following: a) Anthropological evidence, b) The diets eaten by primitive peoples and our own black South Africans who ate a diet high in CHO, low in fat and low in protein, and generally enjoyed good health (none of the hypertension and diabetes seen today) before these rural populations came into contact with western diets (the same applies to many other groups such as the Aborigines in Australia and the Pima Indians in the USA), c) The high CHO intake that top athletes ingest without gaining weight d) The energy content of CHO, protein and fat (e.g. 16, 17 and 37 kJ per gram respectively). I do not think that it really matters at what time of day a food is eaten, but it is a good rule to have a large breakfast, a moderate lunch and a small, light supper, or even better 6 small, healthy meals spaced over the day. Food combining does not seem necessary to me because humans are after all omnivores and our digestive systems are well suited to ingesting a mixture of macronutrients.
Good luck with your studies and your future
DietDoc

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