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Question
Posted by: Lee | 2011/05/04

Running - Shin splints

Hi
I have recently started running - I run at the gym on the in-door track. I get to 2kms and I can''t run anymore, my shins get so sore. I chatted to a personal trainer at the gym and he suggested it could be my shoes - which are Nike womans running shoes.
I went shopping for new shoes, but am confused by all they have. I notice that I run with the outside of my foot coming down first. What does this mean - pronate or norma? What running shoes would you suggest?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFitnessDoc

Hi Lee

I'm not usually inclined to blame the shoes for injury. Unless the shoe is very obviously wrong for you (that is, it's a heavy, bulky shoe that prevents any movement or a flimsy shoe), it's unlikely that the shoe is to blame.

More likely, it's the training that is too rapidly increased for your muscles and tendons. That places strain on the joints and they're not ready for it and so they become inflamed.

Of course, it may be something else too - there are biomechanics issues, flexibility issues that can also contribute to injury and perhaps one of these is in play here. What you really need is a diagnosis, from a qualified physio or biokineticist who can then advise on maybe strengthening the calf or improving flexibility of the calf to help prevent this.

But it's not likely that the shoes are the problem - it's the training, with maybe some mechanical issues, or muscle weakness, underlying it.

Good luck

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: fitnessdoc | 2011/05/12

Hi Lee

I'm not usually inclined to blame the shoes for injury. Unless the shoe is very obviously wrong for you (that is, it's a heavy, bulky shoe that prevents any movement or a flimsy shoe), it's unlikely that the shoe is to blame.

More likely, it's the training that is too rapidly increased for your muscles and tendons. That places strain on the joints and they're not ready for it and so they become inflamed.

Of course, it may be something else too - there are biomechanics issues, flexibility issues that can also contribute to injury and perhaps one of these is in play here. What you really need is a diagnosis, from a qualified physio or biokineticist who can then advise on maybe strengthening the calf or improving flexibility of the calf to help prevent this.

But it's not likely that the shoes are the problem - it's the training, with maybe some mechanical issues, or muscle weakness, underlying it.

Good luck

Reply to fitnessdoc
Posted by: She Marathon Runner | 2011/05/06

" I run with the outside of my foot coming down first" 
You probably have a High Arched Foot (Supinator)

The High Arched Foot tends to be a more rigid, less flexible foot with more weight borne on the outside part of the foot.

Less shock absorption occurs in the foot.

The person tends to wear out the outer side of the shoe from heel to toe &  Calluses may be seen along the outer edge of the foot to the base of the 5th toe.
If this person’ s shoe is placed on a flat surface, the shoe may tilt outward.

Problems seen with this type of foot include stress fractures in the Achilles tendonitis.

The person should wear CUSHIONED shoe to provide shock absorption. As this reduces the amount of impact transmitted upwards through the legs.
The midsole is a softer, more flexible, single density material, providing less support and more cushion.
shoe sole), with a curved or semicurved last shape.

Reply to She Marathon Runner

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