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Question
Posted by: XX | 2012-08-29

Roaccutane &  Lexamil

Hi CS,

I lost a child last year &  I struggled with the grief for a while. The dr initially had me on a higher dose of lexamil, but I felt awful. The lower dose was great.

I have suffered depression before, but it started when I had problems conceiving &  every failed fertility treatment attempt, got me down. I decided to see my doc about it. I took lexamil for a year and was on top of the world. I went off it shortly before trying our last ivf attempt.

I really was well. I had a stressful pregnancy, but was so my old self again. Happy, bubbly, etc. When my baby passed away, I really thought I could deal with the grief myself. I suppressed it too. Everyone around me told me to get on with life 7 forget about it.

I didn''t realize how depressed this was making me. I did go see a grief counsellor &  realized that I needed some help. I visited me gp, we talked about my situation, how I was feeling, etc. Doc decided to put me on lexamil.

Since sending you the last post, I actually stopped the lexamil. I feel great. I will see my gp soon &  let him know I am on roaccutane. I was on it a few yrs back &  never had any problems with depression. It was then that we decided to try for another child &  I went off roaccutane.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Actually, there is no convincing scientific evidence that antidepressants or tranquillizers are really of any help in grief. Time is the main therapeutic agent, and counselling if needed. As you found, trying to suppress grief is not a ood idea. And apparently the grief counselling was indeed more useful for you.
Wise to come off Roaccutane when trying for pregnancy, the risk to a child conceived while on that drug is to great to accept.
The fact that you were able to use Roaccutane previously without a depression, is re-assuring, and so long as you let your doc know and you both watch out for such a complication, you may well be fine this time round, too.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012-08-29

Actually, there is no convincing scientific evidence that antidepressants or tranquillizers are really of any help in grief. Time is the main therapeutic agent, and counselling if needed. As you found, trying to suppress grief is not a ood idea. And apparently the grief counselling was indeed more useful for you.
Wise to come off Roaccutane when trying for pregnancy, the risk to a child conceived while on that drug is to great to accept.
The fact that you were able to use Roaccutane previously without a depression, is re-assuring, and so long as you let your doc know and you both watch out for such a complication, you may well be fine this time round, too.

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