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Posted by: Boo123 | 2012-05-03

response 713

I appreciate your response I myself do not prefer taking too much medication but due to the fact that I did not respond all to well to ssris and my doctor was not keen on fluoxetine (the only ssri I did not try) as she felt it was very stimulating and was not anti anxiety we opted to go for cymbalta what does perplex me though I am told cymbalta is 50 50 in proportion in relation to its serotonin and noadrenalin reuptake, so how is it that cymbalta can have a calmative effect? today was day 7 and I''m on 60mg today. My sleep seems to be better, consumption of my morning coffee speeds my heart rate up!. I just hope I''m doing the right thing. My doc did give me two options to take aropax with sulpiride (apprantly to ease my ibs symptoms which were being caused by aropax) I opted not to, I instead took cymbalta I''m sure you think I''m neurotic but I''ve been untreated for this for a while and I''m comitted to getting over this !! I don''t want to take something that''s not gonna work btw cymbalta is over 600 bux for a pack of 30mg 30 capsule the same darn company makes a generic called cymgem just for about 80 bux less drug companies are the biggest ''legal'' con artists around! With regards to aglomelatine she says their is no evidence of it being any good for panic disorder...another question I''d like to ask what are the effects of cymbalta on the heart you see as you know I used to get frequent ectopic beats I''ve seen an elctrophysiologist and he tells me ''I''d like to know if cymbalta works all over or just in the synapses'' what does that mean? According to him if its in the synapses I need not worry about it causing ectopic beats.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

HiBoo,
All this talk of neurochemicals does get confusing, doesn't it. Frankly, it confuses many doctors and experts, too. Every time it seems to be becoming clearer, someone discovers a newer chemical, or receptor, and it all gets muddy again.
Serotonin-active agents are not at all necessarily stimulating or anxiety proviking - many people find them very handy in managing anxiety disorders. And there are now also many different recognized sub-types of serotonin receptor which explains some of the complexity of how individuals respond differently to the same drug.
Coffee contains caffeine which usually stimulates a faster pulse rate - but most people dont check their pulse before and after a cappucino, an of course if you get anxious about the drug, or the coffee, or anything, that in itself puts the pulse rate up.
Whenever possible I would ALWAYS use the generic form of any drug where a generic is available ; there is no true advantage to taking the more expensive option, except for the drug company.
Two things I don't understand.
I don't understand at all what your doc says about no evidence that agomalatine works in panic disorder. There's loads of evidence, and a simple google search reveals dozens of scientific papers on the topic and the drug company could provide her with more. Its a bizarre opinion for her to hold. And I dont understand how any drug that is effective in anxiety generally, wouldn't be useful in panic dsorder.
And I don't understand your "electrophysiologist";s comment ( maybe as a physiologist not a psychiatrist or pharmacologist, he's not really familiar with drugs ) - but ALL drugs circulate around the body and are widely available to its parts. Maybe he's thinking about whether the drug is available to the synapses ( nerve endings / junctions ) in the brain, rather than in the heart. But this doesn't make sense either. Some drugs dont cross what we call the blood-brain barrier, that is, they can be swallowed or injected, and will be available all round the body, but won't get into the brain itself ; there is no drug which someone miraculously gets into the brain and its synapses, but not into the rest of the body.
Maybe I've had a bad day, and need to sit down with a cup of coffee, and tickle my synapses.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012-05-04

HiBoo,
All this talk of neurochemicals does get confusing, doesn't it. Frankly, it confuses many doctors and experts, too. Every time it seems to be becoming clearer, someone discovers a newer chemical, or receptor, and it all gets muddy again.
Serotonin-active agents are not at all necessarily stimulating or anxiety proviking - many people find them very handy in managing anxiety disorders. And there are now also many different recognized sub-types of serotonin receptor which explains some of the complexity of how individuals respond differently to the same drug.
Coffee contains caffeine which usually stimulates a faster pulse rate - but most people dont check their pulse before and after a cappucino, an of course if you get anxious about the drug, or the coffee, or anything, that in itself puts the pulse rate up.
Whenever possible I would ALWAYS use the generic form of any drug where a generic is available ; there is no true advantage to taking the more expensive option, except for the drug company.
Two things I don't understand.
I don't understand at all what your doc says about no evidence that agomalatine works in panic disorder. There's loads of evidence, and a simple google search reveals dozens of scientific papers on the topic and the drug company could provide her with more. Its a bizarre opinion for her to hold. And I dont understand how any drug that is effective in anxiety generally, wouldn't be useful in panic dsorder.
And I don't understand your "electrophysiologist";s comment ( maybe as a physiologist not a psychiatrist or pharmacologist, he's not really familiar with drugs ) - but ALL drugs circulate around the body and are widely available to its parts. Maybe he's thinking about whether the drug is available to the synapses ( nerve endings / junctions ) in the brain, rather than in the heart. But this doesn't make sense either. Some drugs dont cross what we call the blood-brain barrier, that is, they can be swallowed or injected, and will be available all round the body, but won't get into the brain itself ; there is no drug which someone miraculously gets into the brain and its synapses, but not into the rest of the body.
Maybe I've had a bad day, and need to sit down with a cup of coffee, and tickle my synapses.

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