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Question
Posted by: miekie | 2010/10/21

reply to post 1115

Hello dr.
Ek sien tans ''n psigiater. Ek voel nie elke oggend so nie, net wanneer my bloeddruk laag val, pms het. Het voorval met my dr. bespreek en toetse het gewys ek is pre-menopausal en serotien vlakke is laag dan gedurende pre -pms . She recommended earlier breakfast and later during the day moderate exercise and use 1 extra Urbanol. I get panickly when my bloodpressure suddenly drops or get angina pain, then anxiety sets in. I do try to be calm and relaxed but its difficult when everything is out of sinc. I''m also insuline-resistant and try really to eat healthy and more often. Just wanted to know if above mentioned symptoms can cause more anxiety during hormonal changes during my cycle. What do you think?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

I'm sorry to harp on the point, but measuring serotonin levels in the blood is often a very dubious investigation, as there's no useful correlation between serotonin levels in the blood and the levels in the brain, which are where they affect out mood.
Earlier breakfast might help. There might also be some of what we call Orthostatic Hypotension, which is much less alarming than it sounds ! Our system has to work quite hard to maintain a normal blood pressure if we move suddenly from a night spent lying flat, to quickly standing up, and there may be a transient drop in BP letting us feel briefly dizzy and odd. If this might be happening, try tom avoid standing up quickly in the morning. Sit up for a while before standing up, do it more gradually, and maybe the symptoms won't arise.
I would think that seeing a counsellor using the Cognitive-Behaviour Therapty mehod ( CBT ) to help you learn both not to be so alarmed when your body is doing perfectly normal things ( even if they feel a bit odd for a while ) and to learn to be able to control your anxiety in these situations, could be very useful.
Angina can be a vicious circle - if you allow yourself to get very anxious and stressed when you feel a little angina, that in itself could make the angina feel worse.
I don't think those symptoms "cause" anxiety in the sense of making anxiety inevitable and certain - they surely would not do so if you were asleep or unconscious at the time - what alarms you and makes you feel anxious, is your own mind, your interpretation of the meaning of the symptoms, and asuming that they mean something alarming and awful might happen. THAT is what is causing the anxiety. And that is good news, because that psychological component you can learn to control.

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1
Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/10/21

I'm sorry to harp on the point, but measuring serotonin levels in the blood is often a very dubious investigation, as there's no useful correlation between serotonin levels in the blood and the levels in the brain, which are where they affect out mood.
Earlier breakfast might help. There might also be some of what we call Orthostatic Hypotension, which is much less alarming than it sounds ! Our system has to work quite hard to maintain a normal blood pressure if we move suddenly from a night spent lying flat, to quickly standing up, and there may be a transient drop in BP letting us feel briefly dizzy and odd. If this might be happening, try tom avoid standing up quickly in the morning. Sit up for a while before standing up, do it more gradually, and maybe the symptoms won't arise.
I would think that seeing a counsellor using the Cognitive-Behaviour Therapty mehod ( CBT ) to help you learn both not to be so alarmed when your body is doing perfectly normal things ( even if they feel a bit odd for a while ) and to learn to be able to control your anxiety in these situations, could be very useful.
Angina can be a vicious circle - if you allow yourself to get very anxious and stressed when you feel a little angina, that in itself could make the angina feel worse.
I don't think those symptoms "cause" anxiety in the sense of making anxiety inevitable and certain - they surely would not do so if you were asleep or unconscious at the time - what alarms you and makes you feel anxious, is your own mind, your interpretation of the meaning of the symptoms, and asuming that they mean something alarming and awful might happen. THAT is what is causing the anxiety. And that is good news, because that psychological component you can learn to control.

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