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Posted by: Lizzie | 2011/01/31

Reluctant to get help after feeling depressed for years

I''m in my mid-twenties and for as long as I can remember (since at least 12 yrs old probably earlier then that) I''ve been a pessimistic, glass half empty, moody, gloomy and sad person. I feel like I have good days once in awhile (maybe even a few weeks) but always end up back in the dumps. There have been times where it got much worse in high school and college and i ended up engaging in self injury to cope with the stress.

I would say it doesn''t really effect my life as I''m currently living it, but i''m definitely not living the way I want to. I spent so long isolating myself from peers I have very few friends and a non-existent social life. I never got as far in post-secondary education as I wanted and am too afraid of failing and starting to self-injure again to go back. I''m a skilled competitive horse rider but my confidence gets in the way of competing at the level I should.

I''ve been this way for so long I don''t know what " normal"  is like, or heck this may be normal. I can''t seem to convince myself that getting help would be worth it. Feeling crappy all the time is exhausting but the thought of having to work to get out of it seems even more exhausting and overwhelming.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

OK, obviously i'd be useful for you to see a good local shrink for a proper assessment and diagnosis, and then a discussion of treatment options. Some of us, for instance, don't have depression, but may have Dysthymia, a sort of thinner but long-stretched out form of depression, gloomy-by-habit. Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy ( CBT ) is good at assessing the unhelpful habits of thought and behaviour which hamper our ability to be properly effective and content in life, and to help us actively change those in more fruitful ways.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: Maria | 2011/01/31

Lizzie, that feeling of reluctance to seek help is a symptom of the problem. I''ve been there, done that. You have good insight and you know life should be better. When I started therapy I realised that a large part of my problem is that I feel I have to always do everything perfectly. So I will rather not try, or procrastinate, than do something that I think I might not be brilliant at. This view of life really limited me and I still need to constantly remind myself that nobody is perfect, and one really only needs to be good enough. Go and get help, you deserve it. And if you can''t motivate yourself for your own sake, do it for your horse, I always think it must feel horrible to mine if I get on his back when I feel crappy.

Reply to Maria
Posted by: cybershrink | 2011/01/31

OK, obviously i'd be useful for you to see a good local shrink for a proper assessment and diagnosis, and then a discussion of treatment options. Some of us, for instance, don't have depression, but may have Dysthymia, a sort of thinner but long-stretched out form of depression, gloomy-by-habit. Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy ( CBT ) is good at assessing the unhelpful habits of thought and behaviour which hamper our ability to be properly effective and content in life, and to help us actively change those in more fruitful ways.

Reply to cybershrink

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