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Question
Posted by: Mahomed | 2012/06/28

REF: Question #698 / RE: Diazepam

Sir,

Unfortunately some GP''''s prescribe these medications too freely, without weighing the benefits against the side affects. I used to have OCD and was told that I also have an "  anxiety"  problem, being "  very highly strung"  . The diazepam has helped me in that I have successfully overcome both these problems. Diazepam did help but it is only by the will of God, I must add.

I have been weaning off by reducing 2.5mg a day, holding for two weeks and then cutting down another 2.5mg a day and so on.

I thank you for your expert advise. I shall now try what you say and hopefully in another month or 2 be off it completely - May God help me - never to touch another benzodiazapine ever in my life again.

Thanking you kindly.

Yours faithfully,
Mahomed

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Oh yes, M, you're absolutely right, and I do wish GPs ( and some pspecialists, too ) were more careful and responsible about this. I believe they shouldn't prescribe ANYTHING to you without fully explaining at least the most likely side-effects, cautions and problems, so you can make a better decision about whether to follow their advice, and be forewarned appropriately.
And they must not blame patients for problems that may arise from doing what their doc advised !
Sounds like you have admirably conquered the anxiety and OCD-style problems by your own good efforts, aided by diazepam relieving the anxiety while you did so. This is why combining safer meds with CBT, which tries to do more predictably successfully what you excellently managed on your own, is the best way of dealing with these problems.
Your plan now sounds likely to succeed. If there are hassles on the way, don't despair - just go back up to the last dose on which you felt fine, and then start reducing again, by either a smaller decrease, or at less frequent intervals.
It really does show outstanding fibre and determination to manage as far as you have, on your own. To avlid such problems, this is why we recommend using other drugs whenever possible, and when this family of drugs, the benzos, are used, to never use them for more than 2 months maximum at a time, and maybe even with a couple of drug-free days in the week even during that time, as this reduces the risk of dependency.
Should any anxiety problems turn up later in life, do see a psychiatrist rather than a GP, and look towards CBT and/or careful use of drugs also used as antidepressants, instead of these benzos.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012/06/28

Oh yes, M, you're absolutely right, and I do wish GPs ( and some pspecialists, too ) were more careful and responsible about this. I believe they shouldn't prescribe ANYTHING to you without fully explaining at least the most likely side-effects, cautions and problems, so you can make a better decision about whether to follow their advice, and be forewarned appropriately.
And they must not blame patients for problems that may arise from doing what their doc advised !
Sounds like you have admirably conquered the anxiety and OCD-style problems by your own good efforts, aided by diazepam relieving the anxiety while you did so. This is why combining safer meds with CBT, which tries to do more predictably successfully what you excellently managed on your own, is the best way of dealing with these problems.
Your plan now sounds likely to succeed. If there are hassles on the way, don't despair - just go back up to the last dose on which you felt fine, and then start reducing again, by either a smaller decrease, or at less frequent intervals.
It really does show outstanding fibre and determination to manage as far as you have, on your own. To avlid such problems, this is why we recommend using other drugs whenever possible, and when this family of drugs, the benzos, are used, to never use them for more than 2 months maximum at a time, and maybe even with a couple of drug-free days in the week even during that time, as this reduces the risk of dependency.
Should any anxiety problems turn up later in life, do see a psychiatrist rather than a GP, and look towards CBT and/or careful use of drugs also used as antidepressants, instead of these benzos.

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