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Question
Posted by: fae | 2010/05/23

re ongoing therapy

As you say, so much depends on the client. I am one for whom CBT did not work, because the new thought patterns that I applied, new behaviours I employed, although I employed them diligently, did not change my perception of myself. When your very essence is damaged, no amount of thinking or behaving yourself into a new identity or a new way of living life will work. You have to go deep and work with the emotions connected with the source of your problem. Once you have done that, CBT can work.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

I understand and know that viewpoint, though it also echoes the sort of theories and arguments that analytically-oriented therapists build into their clients, so as to manage to maintain many years of at least financially profitable therapy.
Your perception of yourself is a construct of a set of assumptions you have made about yourself which need to be tackled directly and changed, rather than by endless digging down into an increasingly mythical and theoretical past.
As the evidence confirms, it is remarkable how little data shows that - "uncovering" "deep" "sources" actually reliably improves the symptoms from which anyone is suffering, and how often dealing with the symptoms themselves relieves the problem.
It's like someone with a distorted arm following an old fracture. What helps is for someone to do a good assessment of the arm as it is now, and how it can, perhaps with the aid of surgery or exercies, be returned as far as possible to normal functioning. Trying laboriously and at great length to reconstruct and recall the precise details of the injury is useless, and simply leaves one with the same crippled arm, and a bundle of reminiscences, some accurate, some false recollections conjured up to fit the therapists theoretical expectations.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/05/24

I understand and know that viewpoint, though it also echoes the sort of theories and arguments that analytically-oriented therapists build into their clients, so as to manage to maintain many years of at least financially profitable therapy.
Your perception of yourself is a construct of a set of assumptions you have made about yourself which need to be tackled directly and changed, rather than by endless digging down into an increasingly mythical and theoretical past.
As the evidence confirms, it is remarkable how little data shows that - "uncovering" "deep" "sources" actually reliably improves the symptoms from which anyone is suffering, and how often dealing with the symptoms themselves relieves the problem.
It's like someone with a distorted arm following an old fracture. What helps is for someone to do a good assessment of the arm as it is now, and how it can, perhaps with the aid of surgery or exercies, be returned as far as possible to normal functioning. Trying laboriously and at great length to reconstruct and recall the precise details of the injury is useless, and simply leaves one with the same crippled arm, and a bundle of reminiscences, some accurate, some false recollections conjured up to fit the therapists theoretical expectations.

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