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Question
Posted by: adeline | 2010/08/25

re after-sales service

Hi there. Fascinating reading, this forum. I am a speech/language/hearing therapist and quite a number of my cases have large emotional components. Like anyone working for a living, I want to be paid for my services. However, when I read about the psychologist who would not even respond to sms and e-mail correspondence after terminating therapy, I was disgusted. It takes two minutes of your time to respond and it could be just about reminding your client what he/she learned in therapy. It could just be a word of encouragement! Cybershrink, ethically speaking, do you think that psychologist behaved properly by ignoring his/her client''s smses and e-mails?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

The line is that what adeline is suggesing is entirely professional and beneficial ; and the previously discussed shrink was unethical in flirting and more by e-mail. Those messages were for his personal enjoyment, and contrary to what would benefit the patient.
I like the phrase after-sales service. Similarly, if a former patient needs a medical certificate, or a letter confirming some detail of the treatment, I believe a good therapist should be happy to do so.
And it is both professional and simple human courtesy to reply to e-mails and letters. If you feel there is some good PROFESSIONAL reason why you can't do what the former patient is asking for, you should reply briefly and politel explaining why you are unable to do what was asked.
Anon expresses it excallently !
Detailed professional guidelines haven't really properly covered some of the more modern methods of communicating, but it's the CONTENT that matters most.
And if the words would be unprofessional and queasy if delivered in person, they are still improper however delivered. Similarly, if the shrink rudely ignored you when you said Hello when encountering them in the mall, its just as rude to entirely ignore messages sent by other means.

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5
Our users say:
Posted by: anon | 2010/08/26

I think the " unethical shrink"  was getting a bit friendly on his but dont really know. I think they shuld just have strict rules so that everyone knows what is allowed and not. I dont understand why we suld need to email

Reply to anon
Posted by: Lulu | 2010/08/26

What kind of email contact is okay with shrinks - I have always been to scared to contact mine but I have phoned in emergencies. What happened with the " unethical shrink" ? What kind of emails were these?

Reply to Lulu
Posted by: Anon | 2010/08/26

The Line is where the actual words used are inappropriate. Also, the patient contacted the shrink. A simple, " HI got your email, glad you''re feeling better OR sorry you''re feeling down - please give me a call'' would be fine. " HI, darling, if you''re feeling down maybe we can go for coffee"  would not be ok.

Also, I have a shrink &  was communicating with her via email. However, when she upgarded her email, I couldn''t receive hers anymore. It took us a couple of weeks to work this one out. SO maybe the person should actually phoen &  make sure the shrink actually received the emails/sms!!!

Reply to Anon
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/08/26

The line is that what adeline is suggesing is entirely professional and beneficial ; and the previously discussed shrink was unethical in flirting and more by e-mail. Those messages were for his personal enjoyment, and contrary to what would benefit the patient.
I like the phrase after-sales service. Similarly, if a former patient needs a medical certificate, or a letter confirming some detail of the treatment, I believe a good therapist should be happy to do so.
And it is both professional and simple human courtesy to reply to e-mails and letters. If you feel there is some good PROFESSIONAL reason why you can't do what the former patient is asking for, you should reply briefly and politel explaining why you are unable to do what was asked.
Anon expresses it excallently !
Detailed professional guidelines haven't really properly covered some of the more modern methods of communicating, but it's the CONTENT that matters most.
And if the words would be unprofessional and queasy if delivered in person, they are still improper however delivered. Similarly, if the shrink rudely ignored you when you said Hello when encountering them in the mall, its just as rude to entirely ignore messages sent by other means.

Reply to cybershrink
Posted by: sam | 2010/08/25

Yeah but then what of the unethical shrink that did email and by the sounds of it got himself and his client into a whole lot of trouble?

Where''s the line?




Reply to sam

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