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Question
Posted by: MIEMIE | 2010/02/25

Q FEVER - CHRONIC

INTRODUCTION
My medical condition at present is not acceptable as it is causing disruption to my home life, exhausting my medical aid scheme and putting my job into jeopardy. My position had not stabilised over the years but in fact has become worse. I respect and appreciate the treatment I am getting when I’ m in hospital but feel that the treatment should be ongoing and a more preventative approach should be taken.

HISTORY
I have been getting ill for the last 4 years on a recurring basis. It started with an attack approximately twice a year. This then increased to three times a year in the last two years. The frequency of attacks has just recently reduced to four months apart i.e. September and now January I was in hospital for 3 weeks.

QUESTIONS
1.Initially I was treated for Meningitis and intermittently Encephalitis and after further specialised examination it was found to be Q Fever. I assume that we are only dealing with Q Fever there or do I still get Meningitis from time to time.?
2.Currently I am being treated for Q Fever. What is severity of the Q Fever i.e. acute, chronic or something else.
3.I am being treated with Doxycycline while in hospital. Is there anything stronger that can be administered or can a -|- tail be considered e.g. a combination of Doxycycline and Quinoline. Rifampin is another medication that I saw on the internet see reference below.
4.“ Antibiotic treatment is most effective when initiated within the first 3 days of illness.”  How can I detect at an early stage that I have contacted the illness. My own diagnosis is getting a severe headache then a stiff neck followed by nausea and a high fever of 39 to 40 degrees. I would like to know when I should react to these symptoms and what course of action I should take. For example should I consult with you the moment I start to get the headache or only when my neck starts to stiffen up and my temperature rises above a certain threshold?
5.I am assuming that if I detect this at an early stage, and administer medication, that the duration of the illness be reduced or curbed (stopped) completely for that round, Or should I at that stage go straight into hospital to get the illness placed under hospital control.
6.How many patients get with recurring Q Fever, and can you share their situation with me.
7.How many cases of recurring Q Fever are there in South Africa, and is there a specialist that can be contacted for further investigation. is there another specialist somewhere in SA or overseas that specifically deals with Q Fever that you can refer me to.


Sorry I know this is a mouth full, but I would realy appreciate your help.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberDoc

Hallo Miemie
Where do you live? I think you should maybe see an infectious disease specialist and I know of someone in Pretoria. Q fever is not common in South Africa, except in people who regularly work with animals. It is not really known for causing meningitis type symptoms? See also http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001337.htm
Dr Bets

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: sylvia | 2014/01/31

my mother has had qfver going on 3 years and now its to where they doctors and not sure what do do anymore. they have tried 3 different meds and none are helping some are causing other problems in her body. we live in temple texas does anyone know where around here is there another specialists we can og for second opinion. please let me know at sylviaann_2003@hotmail.com

Reply to sylvia
Posted by: cyberdoc | 2010/02/26

Hallo Miemie
Where do you live? I think you should maybe see an infectious disease specialist and I know of someone in Pretoria. Q fever is not common in South Africa, except in people who regularly work with animals. It is not really known for causing meningitis type symptoms? See also http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001337.htm
Dr Bets

Reply to cyberdoc

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