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Question
Posted by: Sanet | 2012/03/13

Psychologist

I firstly want to say I am glad you have the pop up with the forum rules, because people have been becoming quite mean, making Bipolar people out as being the worst people ever. It has actually made me quite depressed.
I have a session with my old Psychologist tonight, and would like to know how to approach the situation. She says she does not want to discuss these " issues"  over email, but I think she means accusations. I just said that I''m not happy with her and the Shrinks inaction to my reduced dose of Geodon, and I really needed to see her last week, and I made it very clear in my SMS to her, and she did not bother to phone me to schedule another appoinment (like she always does). Previously she would have been concerned and phoned me to find out why I am so distressed. What do I say to her? I said everything there is to say in my email. And how do I decide if I want to continue therapy with her or not? She clearly does not realise that I am hypomanic, or was last week and how do I get the message accross. She minimizes my hypomanic symptoms - always. But that I can deal with, because otherwise she is a very good therapist. I have a shrink that can deal with the medical stuff. I still have to inform her that I''m not seeing her shrink any longer and that will not go down very well. Because she only refers to him.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Try to avoid acccusations in the sense of complaining that she did things as though intentionally intending to affect you negatively, and concentrate on what happened WHICH MADE YOU feel bad. She's an expert on professional behaviour, but you're the expert on how things, events, remarks, whatever, make you feel.
You can, as you began to, discuss the Geodon crisis, and how you felt abandoned when neither of them seemed to take it as seriously as you felt it needed to be addressed, and how you felt abandoned and alone at a time when you needed support. If she was unavailable a the time you most urgently felt the need for her support, you can mention that, and consider how someone who is very busy as she surely is, could handle such a crisis differently.
If you have already addressed all the issues in an email to her ( take a copy with you ) it may be more that she wants to explain and respond directly rather than by e-mail, so this would set the main agenda.
Maybe emphasize that you were alarmed when she did not respond promptly in the way she had usually done in previous crises. She hasn't had the opportunity to assess you lately, so you can poin t out that you have, in your view, been hypomanic lately, and that this needs to be taken into account, and that you feel she tends to minimize the significance of the symptoms you consider hypomanic.
Its pretty usual for a particular psychiatrist and psychologist to often refer patients to each other - its usually best to refer to someone you know and have comfidence in. So you can calmly point out how you found that the psychiatrist responded very inadequately to the geodon crisis, to the point that he failed to get it covered by the medical aid, when you on your own were able to do so.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012/03/13

Try to avoid acccusations in the sense of complaining that she did things as though intentionally intending to affect you negatively, and concentrate on what happened WHICH MADE YOU feel bad. She's an expert on professional behaviour, but you're the expert on how things, events, remarks, whatever, make you feel.
You can, as you began to, discuss the Geodon crisis, and how you felt abandoned when neither of them seemed to take it as seriously as you felt it needed to be addressed, and how you felt abandoned and alone at a time when you needed support. If she was unavailable a the time you most urgently felt the need for her support, you can mention that, and consider how someone who is very busy as she surely is, could handle such a crisis differently.
If you have already addressed all the issues in an email to her ( take a copy with you ) it may be more that she wants to explain and respond directly rather than by e-mail, so this would set the main agenda.
Maybe emphasize that you were alarmed when she did not respond promptly in the way she had usually done in previous crises. She hasn't had the opportunity to assess you lately, so you can poin t out that you have, in your view, been hypomanic lately, and that this needs to be taken into account, and that you feel she tends to minimize the significance of the symptoms you consider hypomanic.
Its pretty usual for a particular psychiatrist and psychologist to often refer patients to each other - its usually best to refer to someone you know and have comfidence in. So you can calmly point out how you found that the psychiatrist responded very inadequately to the geodon crisis, to the point that he failed to get it covered by the medical aid, when you on your own were able to do so.

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