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Question
Posted by: D | 2010/04/13

Psychoanalysis

Dear CS

I am curious as SASOP have come back with a very contradictory report (after I had thought the matter to be closed), they have stated that the senior therapist cannot find evidence of " professional management"  based on my report alone but that my therapist will be required to examine the matter in depth with this therapist ie undergo further in depth supervision. I had consulted 4 senior psychiatrists in this matter all of whom found the informal e-mail/sms relationship between us(which took place over and above the actual face to face therapy - much of that discussed in the e-mails was not discussed in session) to constitute blatant boundary blurring.

My question is hopefully straightforward - is boundary blurring between psychiatrist and patient considered to be professional mismanagement? What exactly is professional mismanagement?

D

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Oresumably their comment refers to "professional MISmanagement " ? Though the reference ought to be to professional misconduct. But i sounds like an excellent idea that the doc involved should undergo supervision, which is what he should have organized for himself as soon as things started to go wrong.
It sounds as though they have recognized that he was doing wrong, but fear criticising him toom openly. If they called this unprofessional conduct or misconduct( and in other countries I have little doubt this is what it would be called ) they would be obliged to be more strict and stern i how they dealt with him.
How old is this inappropriately powerful person ? To act as naively as he did he'd presumabl be really young ; if not, he was old enough to know better, and not well trained in analysis or general psychotherapy if he didn't recognize very early on what was happening and exactly how he should have dealt with it.
In my view, boundary blurring of the sort you describe was improper and incompetent, the degree and effects of it would need to be assessed in deciding how serious an offense this was.
"Professional mismanagement" is a weedy and unhelpful term for them to use. One aspect of the problem could be as you alluded to earlier, that maybe none of them are well-informed about psychoanalysis and therefore may feel uncertain about how to assess it.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/04/13

Oresumably their comment refers to "professional MISmanagement " ? Though the reference ought to be to professional misconduct. But i sounds like an excellent idea that the doc involved should undergo supervision, which is what he should have organized for himself as soon as things started to go wrong.
It sounds as though they have recognized that he was doing wrong, but fear criticising him toom openly. If they called this unprofessional conduct or misconduct( and in other countries I have little doubt this is what it would be called ) they would be obliged to be more strict and stern i how they dealt with him.
How old is this inappropriately powerful person ? To act as naively as he did he'd presumabl be really young ; if not, he was old enough to know better, and not well trained in analysis or general psychotherapy if he didn't recognize very early on what was happening and exactly how he should have dealt with it.
In my view, boundary blurring of the sort you describe was improper and incompetent, the degree and effects of it would need to be assessed in deciding how serious an offense this was.
"Professional mismanagement" is a weedy and unhelpful term for them to use. One aspect of the problem could be as you alluded to earlier, that maybe none of them are well-informed about psychoanalysis and therefore may feel uncertain about how to assess it.

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