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Question
Posted by: Concerned Husband | 2012/03/27

PCOS -

Hi

my Wife has just found out she has PCOS . She doesnt know what to feel? I know that PCOS is treateable , even curable.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Obviously technically this isn't a psychiatric question, and I hope our gynae can provide more useful guidance about Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. My understanding is that it is actually really common, and may cause few problems or a number of hormone-related gynae problems, and should respond favourably to treatment. Undoubtedly a nuisance, it's not considered a dread disease.
I'm interested in the words you use, saying "she doesn't know what to feel", which almost sounds as though there is an expected, prescribed way of feeling in response. In fact people will vary.
For some of us, it feels alarming to find there is anything siognificant wrong with us ; for others, if we have been experiencing a range of troublesome symptoms, and especially if we feared something dreadful might be causing them, it could be a considerable relief to receive a diagnosis that says this is something recognized, and treatable, to end the uncertainty and fear.
Encourage her to chat with you about it, and how she feels about it. If she has some specific concerns or worries, make a note of them so she can raise them the next time she sees the gynae ( one often forgets the most troubling questions when actually in the doctor's office )

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2
Our users say:
Posted by: Lin | 2012/03/29

I have PCOS. Yes, it does upset you and causes alot of problems. But it''s treatable and you learn to live with it.

I now have two children after being told I''d never have any. It was more difficult falling pregnant and I was on alot of treatment to fall pregnant the first time, but I fell pregnant naturally the second time.

It makes it harder to loose weight, but if you find the right eating plan, it becomes easier. There''s alot of other smaller niggles that accompanies PCOS, please discuss everything with your gynae.

Reply to Lin
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012/03/27

Obviously technically this isn't a psychiatric question, and I hope our gynae can provide more useful guidance about Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. My understanding is that it is actually really common, and may cause few problems or a number of hormone-related gynae problems, and should respond favourably to treatment. Undoubtedly a nuisance, it's not considered a dread disease.
I'm interested in the words you use, saying "she doesn't know what to feel", which almost sounds as though there is an expected, prescribed way of feeling in response. In fact people will vary.
For some of us, it feels alarming to find there is anything siognificant wrong with us ; for others, if we have been experiencing a range of troublesome symptoms, and especially if we feared something dreadful might be causing them, it could be a considerable relief to receive a diagnosis that says this is something recognized, and treatable, to end the uncertainty and fear.
Encourage her to chat with you about it, and how she feels about it. If she has some specific concerns or worries, make a note of them so she can raise them the next time she sees the gynae ( one often forgets the most troubling questions when actually in the doctor's office )

Reply to cybershrink

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