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Question
Posted by: MJ | 2011/09/27

Paranoia

My fiance and I are very worried about his mother. She is 55years old and is showing increasing signs of paranoia such as her husband plotting secretly behind her back ( which I assure is not true), she is worried her husband is speaking about her to her son behind her back, she is worried she is being monitored through her email and sms activities and that everyone is out to get her. This type of behavior has been seen since my fiance''s childhood such as him not allowed to stay over at friends houses as she feared something would happen to him and constantly questioning him about where he is going and what he is doing and phoning him atleast 3 times daily to see if everything is alright and being very upset if he did not answer. The signs have gotten worse over the years and seem to be progressing quite fast now. I fear that confronting her about it will worsen the situation and we don''t know how to go about getting her to speak to a proffesional.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

There are forms of paranoid disorder which tend to develop later in life ; and they do respond to proper treatment. The problem is, often, finding a way to persaude her to see a good psychiatrist for assessment and a discussion of treatment options ( sometimes they will accept referral and treatment to help them get stronger and better able to cope with the worries they are describing - one acknowledges that what she believes is happening must be alarming and distressing, without agreeing that they are true.
It sounds as though these more recent developments have been an exaggeration of a paranoid personality of long-standing.
COnfrontation is usually useless in most situations, especially one like this. One more often succeeds by being sympathetic about how distressing it must be to have worries like this, that things are, fortunately, often not as bad as they may seem, but none the less they are very stressful, and that its worth seeing someone who understands such concerns, as some treatments may help one to become sronger and better able to cope with these worries

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2011/09/28

There are forms of paranoid disorder which tend to develop later in life ; and they do respond to proper treatment. The problem is, often, finding a way to persaude her to see a good psychiatrist for assessment and a discussion of treatment options ( sometimes they will accept referral and treatment to help them get stronger and better able to cope with the worries they are describing - one acknowledges that what she believes is happening must be alarming and distressing, without agreeing that they are true.
It sounds as though these more recent developments have been an exaggeration of a paranoid personality of long-standing.
COnfrontation is usually useless in most situations, especially one like this. One more often succeeds by being sympathetic about how distressing it must be to have worries like this, that things are, fortunately, often not as bad as they may seem, but none the less they are very stressful, and that its worth seeing someone who understands such concerns, as some treatments may help one to become sronger and better able to cope with these worries

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