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Question
Posted by: Sara | 2008/08/28

Overweight labrador

My labrador bitch was spayed 18 months ago and went from a ' normal'  size to very overweight in 6 months She is allergic to beef and chicken protein so eats Vets Choice Sensitive. She and her friend, a german shepherd bitch, have lots of exercise - walks etc and do not eat more than the standard amount of food. She is also quite a muscular dog - not flabby but I am worried about the strain on her heart. How can I help her?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberVet

Dear Sara

Feed her less and have her tested for an underactive thyroid gland. If the thyroid hormones are normal, just less food for exercise.

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2
Our users say:
Posted by: Chill | 2008/08/28

Dogs getting fat as a result of spaying is a myth. They get fat, as do humans, when their energy intake is greater than their energy output.

Either you will need to up her exercise, or reduce her intake. Look at treats she may be getting before you cut down food as such - often, it' s the sum total of the treats that does the damage, and these should be reduced first.

A femal lab, in ' working'  condition - ie, fit, healthy, active - should weigh between 25 and 30 kg - obviously, if she is large and muscular, she' ll be round the upper limit of this.

Reply to Chill
Posted by: Danie | 2008/08/28

Your Labrador will no doubt start developing serious joint problems especially in her front legs. You need to contain the weight increase.
Our Lab also has a similar problem. We found that, although expensive, Hills dogfood has an answer for most ' conditions' . Speak to you local Vet to identify the correct type.

Reply to Danie

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