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Question
Posted by: eva | 2010/05/22

ongoing therapy

What do you think of a mature woman who keeps going for psychotherapy for nearly a year for an identity problem?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Can't really answer so general a question. "identity problem" is too vague a diagnosis, so if the therapist was properly trained, a more detailed and specific diagnosis should have been made. Then the issue would be what FORM of therapy is being used. With methods that have good scientific evidence showing them to be effective, like CBT ( Cognitive-behaviour Therapy ) a year is rather a long time, but so long as specified goals were being met, it could be reasonable. If its wishy-washy analytic style therapy, there is still after so many decades, no good evidence that it is effective, and it can last forever without demonstrable benefits.
The woman's "maturity" wouldn't be particularly relevant - the form of psychotherapy, the method used, the diagnosis made, and the specific goals being worked towards, would be important in assessing whether this is useful or not.
TOo many analytic-style therapies inducwe dependency on themselves and on the therapist, and this helps them to last forever, profitable to the therapist, but expensive for the patient

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/05/22

Can't really answer so general a question. "identity problem" is too vague a diagnosis, so if the therapist was properly trained, a more detailed and specific diagnosis should have been made. Then the issue would be what FORM of therapy is being used. With methods that have good scientific evidence showing them to be effective, like CBT ( Cognitive-behaviour Therapy ) a year is rather a long time, but so long as specified goals were being met, it could be reasonable. If its wishy-washy analytic style therapy, there is still after so many decades, no good evidence that it is effective, and it can last forever without demonstrable benefits.
The woman's "maturity" wouldn't be particularly relevant - the form of psychotherapy, the method used, the diagnosis made, and the specific goals being worked towards, would be important in assessing whether this is useful or not.
TOo many analytic-style therapies inducwe dependency on themselves and on the therapist, and this helps them to last forever, profitable to the therapist, but expensive for the patient

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