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Question
Posted by: Chris J | 2011/10/08

OCD and Depression

Dear Professor Simpson,

It''s been ages since I have come onto this wonderful forum. (I guess abt 5 years ago was my last time). Since you gave me such excellent advise, I was free from my condition ..Well I am bck and I have this problem. As an attorney I am going through a bit os stress at the moment...So here goes...about 6 months ago, when i gt bck from CT, I all of a sudden got this severe panic attack, and this attack wasa caused by me thinking " stupid thoughts" ..like i am going to hurt my 3 year old...I got a fright of my life..and ran outside the house....A few days later I began crying and telling myself that I will NEVER DO that, and it''s just involuntary....It seemed to ave went away..and it''s back again.. I am getting really scared..even when my son is with me..i am getting anxiouxs and my panic attack decides to take over me...BUT I AM IN CONTROL...I feel depressed now for the last 2 weeks..very anxious....Doc, I will NEVER HURT MY BABY..NEVER...You recommended some years ago..CBT..i must say that was my life saver.....Would you recommend CBT for this condition....I joined the Virgin Active Today..and I am gonna try and de-stress away....I belive I may have OCD....A per my very good shrink friend in PTA....Can u assist ?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Ech, some sites are so wonderful one really does feel compelled to visit them every 5 years or so ! : )
Seriously, though. Panic attacks or just sheer severe anxiety can arise for various reasons. With some versions of OCD, for instance, ( Obsesive-Compulsive Disorder ) one tends to develop really severe obsessive fears of highly unlikely ot even impossible fearful things happening - and they're often about contamination / infection, dread disease, being harmed or harming others. These are indeed "stupid thoughts", in that they come unbidden, frighten us, seem so convincing emotionally though we know intellectually they are not so. And depression is often a part of the picture.
A return to CBT may indeed be most helpful, but preferably after a proper in-person assessment by a good clinical psychologist or psychiatrist to clarify the components of the active diagnosis, and to discuss treatment options. Combining a good modern antidepressant ( also helpful in most anxiety disorders ) with CBT might be really useful. Abd do, indeed, attend to this soon, as the longer one leaves such problems unattended, the more of a grip they can develop and the harder they may become to shake off.

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2
Our users say:
Posted by: chris j | 2011/10/08

Well thanks a million, Prof....this really helps..I see you still have''nt lost your " spark" ...okay..so that means that i am NOT GOING NUTS...or PSYCHOTIC here......Just merely a phase that needs to be treated.....

cheers chris

Reply to chris j
Posted by: cybershrink | 2011/10/08

Ech, some sites are so wonderful one really does feel compelled to visit them every 5 years or so ! : )
Seriously, though. Panic attacks or just sheer severe anxiety can arise for various reasons. With some versions of OCD, for instance, ( Obsesive-Compulsive Disorder ) one tends to develop really severe obsessive fears of highly unlikely ot even impossible fearful things happening - and they're often about contamination / infection, dread disease, being harmed or harming others. These are indeed "stupid thoughts", in that they come unbidden, frighten us, seem so convincing emotionally though we know intellectually they are not so. And depression is often a part of the picture.
A return to CBT may indeed be most helpful, but preferably after a proper in-person assessment by a good clinical psychologist or psychiatrist to clarify the components of the active diagnosis, and to discuss treatment options. Combining a good modern antidepressant ( also helpful in most anxiety disorders ) with CBT might be really useful. Abd do, indeed, attend to this soon, as the longer one leaves such problems unattended, the more of a grip they can develop and the harder they may become to shake off.

Reply to cybershrink

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