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Question
Posted by: ANIMAL LOVER | 2012/06/29

OBSESSION WITH HELPING DOGS/CATS

I am known by my family and friends that I cannot drive past any stray dog in the street without trying to rescue it and take it to the nearest shelter or his owners etc. I know that not all doggies that are outside are stray and can see the ones that are tired and lost. This morning when I went to the bank I saw a dog in die middle of the road, he was in excellent condition with a winter jacket on so I decided to help him. After an hour the SPCA came to help because he just didn''t want me to pick him up. Now my boss tells me that I have a problem and maybe because I don''t have children it is the reason for my behaviour. I should see someone. I get very emotional about animals and cannot stand them being abused in any way. I donate money to animal shelters etc. Surely there must be other people out there that also do what I do. My boss never-ever gives anything to anyone, not a car watch, homeless person, and will over his dead body stop and pick up a dog. Now I am thinking is the problem really with me, or with him!!!. I took an hour to get back to the office this morning, maybe that was the problem, I rescued a dog in HIS time.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

I, too, am a sucker for animals in distress - but your employer is fully entitled, legally and ethically, to expect you to do everything expected of you at work. That's what you get paid for. Either do your animal rescue work in your own spare time ( maybe more expertly than you do now, by volunteering to work specific times with an animal shelter or similar charity ) or full-time work with a vet, SPCA, or suchlike.
Whether your boss chooses to give to charities, either money or help, (a) is none of your business, and (b) is probably something you actually know nothing about as he probably does whatever he might be doing, in his own time, exactly as you should.
Yes, indeed, by spendin an hour of your working day he had paid for, to rescue that particular dog, you forced him to pay for the rescue, which isn't ethical

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Our users say:
Posted by: Tanya | 2012/06/29

Animal Lover.....I too am exactly the same as you are regarding animals. I have dog food, plastic bowls and a huge bottle of water in the boot of my car to put on pavements when I see, specially dogs, that are lost, distressed and starving.
I firstly try and get them to come to me of course, but if they keep running away I put food and water down for them and just have to drive away.

Sometimes they are lost and have a collar with owners name and phone number. I have reunited many distressed doggies with distraught owners. I have already ''side-parked'' my car on a highway, stopping all the traffic, and rescued an animal. The amount of people who follow my lead and help, warm my heart immensely. (With apologies to all impatient drivers!)

I personally dont think you have a problem at all. As for your boss, all I can say is, he is fortunate to have such a compassionate employee! Perhaps a phone call into office if you are delayed for this reason would be appropriate.


Reply to Tanya
Posted by: ANIMAL LOVER | 2012/06/29

Thank you purple, I appreciate your comment. I hear what you are saying. Just want to ad it is the first time I used office time to help a stray dog.

Reply to ANIMAL LOVER
Posted by: Purple | 2012/06/29

You are contratually obliged to be at work during your working hours unless given permission by your boss to not be there (such as to be on leave, sick leave and so on).

If all your boss said was what you have written here, then you have an extremely kind and remarkably restrained boss.

Is it not more likely that all you heard of the discussion was that, but what was actually said was that you need to be present during working hours and if you would like to help animals, do so, but not when you should be at work and if you don''t stop taking time off from work to do these personal crusades, that disciplinary action may follow? That''s what most bosses would say.

What about finding permanent work at an animal shelter? What about looking for a job at a vets? Could you train to be a vetinary nurse? Perhaps you have missed your calling in life?

Reply to Purple
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012/06/29

I, too, am a sucker for animals in distress - but your employer is fully entitled, legally and ethically, to expect you to do everything expected of you at work. That's what you get paid for. Either do your animal rescue work in your own spare time ( maybe more expertly than you do now, by volunteering to work specific times with an animal shelter or similar charity ) or full-time work with a vet, SPCA, or suchlike.
Whether your boss chooses to give to charities, either money or help, (a) is none of your business, and (b) is probably something you actually know nothing about as he probably does whatever he might be doing, in his own time, exactly as you should.
Yes, indeed, by spendin an hour of your working day he had paid for, to rescue that particular dog, you forced him to pay for the rescue, which isn't ethical

Reply to cybershrink

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