advertisement
Question
Posted by: Maria | 2012/03/13

Nightmares

Hey CS, hope you and kitty are well.

Why do some psychiatric meds cause nightmares and vivid dreams? When I took Cymbalta I had such bad nightmares that my husband said I was screaming in my sleep. Now I''m on Venlor and the nightmares and vivid dreams are back, although not quite as bad. On the upside, I''m much more relaxed and less aggressive.

Beginning of the year I tried Agomelatine. I only took it once, because the next morning I was sleepy and extremely dizzy until 9:00. As schools were starting I couldn''t afford to deal with those side effects. (I know they would probably have gone away over time.) I subsequently changed to a new p-doc and he says Agomelatine is useless for someone like me with a long history of various ad''s either not working, or working for a while and then losing efficacy. It should be used for people with mild depression who haven''t had multiple episodes.

Are you familiar with the work of dr. Jim Phelps? He wrote a book called " Why am I still depressed" ? He also has a website which contains a great deal of information but is unfortunately very badly organised.

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

This is an effect I've seen in SOME people on various antidepressants, especially, and is presumably related to some aspect of the generally enlivening impact they're trying to have on the brain, though I've never seen any good research or convincing explanations offered. Like a range of other symptoms, no AD does it in everyone.
I know some foods can stimulate more dreaming ( for me its dairy products like cheese or yoghurt ) and presumably this is from a serotonin effect like many ADs. And maybe if one has a negative filter on as in depression, the dreams would be more likely to be bad ones ?
I disagree with your doctor's views on Agomelatine, which just don't fit the available research. It is NOt considered indicated only for mild depression ( which would be more true of St John's Wort ). Perhaps that has been HIS experience of it, but doesn't fit with wwhat I have seen in the literature or heard from colleagues. It does work significantly on melatonin, unlike the others, so should potentially have a more useful impact on sleep.
I haven't come across Dr Jom Phelps - so long as he isn't busy marketing his book, maybe he has summarized existing knowledge usefully. What's his angle in terms of treatment recommendations ?
After another episode on heat, cat has mercifully stopped yodelling in the hall, which is a relief to all.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012/03/13

This is an effect I've seen in SOME people on various antidepressants, especially, and is presumably related to some aspect of the generally enlivening impact they're trying to have on the brain, though I've never seen any good research or convincing explanations offered. Like a range of other symptoms, no AD does it in everyone.
I know some foods can stimulate more dreaming ( for me its dairy products like cheese or yoghurt ) and presumably this is from a serotonin effect like many ADs. And maybe if one has a negative filter on as in depression, the dreams would be more likely to be bad ones ?
I disagree with your doctor's views on Agomelatine, which just don't fit the available research. It is NOt considered indicated only for mild depression ( which would be more true of St John's Wort ). Perhaps that has been HIS experience of it, but doesn't fit with wwhat I have seen in the literature or heard from colleagues. It does work significantly on melatonin, unlike the others, so should potentially have a more useful impact on sleep.
I haven't come across Dr Jom Phelps - so long as he isn't busy marketing his book, maybe he has summarized existing knowledge usefully. What's his angle in terms of treatment recommendations ?
After another episode on heat, cat has mercifully stopped yodelling in the hall, which is a relief to all.

Reply to cybershrink

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement