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Question
Posted by: biffo | 2008/07/25

Nausea playing rugby

I have a problem when playing rugby where I start to feel nauseous and eventually get sick...getting sick helps immensely and after I get sick Im fine to continue to play on without any difficulty...i am able to play on with the nausea but it is very hampering to performance.....it generally starts just before or around half time but it has happened early and later in matches too....i have been told previously it may be motion sickness or possibly over hydration but neither of these were the solution....i have tried different foods and times of eating before games and nothin has been over effective....generally i find it only occurs in matches which may lead to saying nerves etc but generally I am v relaxed before games and so i dont know if this is the issue

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Our expert says:
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HI Biffo

Very difficult one. Any chance it's impact and collision related? That woudl be a form of motion sickness, which it might be, and I'm not sure how you managed to figure out that it's not. I wonder also what would happen if you did another sport, like say squash, for 40 minutes. Would you get nauseus then too? If so, then motion sickness may well be the cause. Otherwise, collision in tackle situations could explain it. Overhydration is an interesting one, and again, I'm not 100% sure how you eliminated it as a possible cause? The fact that it goes away after being sick suggests it's related to the stomach contents, possibly caused by over-hydration.

Difficult to say, even with all these theories, what the solution might be. Obviously, that's what you're after. Have you tried not eating anything before playing? Alternatively, you might try something salty? During the game, that is, instead of things like Energade or Coke, which is usually what people will drink.

Short of this, medication to prevent nausea seems the only option I can suggest...

Ross

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