advertisement
Question
Posted by: Sensible | 2011/07/27

My brilliant child''s grades dropping drastically

Hello Prof
I have a brilliant 9-yr-old daughter who is in Grade 4 in a private school. She started at this school this year. The thing is she started Grade 1 at a private school, Grades 2 and 3 in a public school (same school), and now Grade 4 in a new private school, a Catholic school (convent). I had to change her schools because I was moving between PTA and JHB searching for a suitable job but now I''m settled in Pretoria. I have decided that she will be in this school until Grade 12. My problem is since Grade 1 she has always been an outstanding performer and receiving all sorts of awards. In her March-April report this year, she got 4 A''s and the rest B''s. She particularly excels in Maths, Science and Computer. But now her June exam marks are very poor although I''ll only get a full report next week (I only received her scripts). She got 40% in Maths, failed two subjects, and only got 3 subjects at 60%. What do you think could be the problem? Could the surrounding (new school) be contributing to this? I really don''t know what to do because she seems okay and says she did not pass well because Grade 4 is hard. Please offer me some light if you can. Thanks.

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Of course you need to discuss this with her teachers. Do I understand you that she started a this new school and did fine in the first term of this year, and markedly worse in the second term ? If so, then it may not be the move per se that has affected her, but maybe something that has changed at the school. Failures in a kid doing well are curious ; 60 % is par for the course - different teachers mark with varying leniency or stringency. Some children are indeed bright, but changes in the curriculum as they move up may mean they face more difficult material, where the methods they learned and relied on before, don't work so well.
The school should be very experienced at understanding such changes and should be able to help you work out what has caused this change, and how to remedy it. Would some temporary extra tutoring help ? Try to avoid her feeling pressure to always be at the top, so that very good but not quite excellent results are felt to be failure.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

5
Our users say:
Posted by: Sensible | 2011/07/29

Romany, I don''t feel insulted, don''t worry. Thanks for your input.

Reply to Sensible
Posted by: Romany | 2011/07/28

Hi Sensible. it was not my intention to insult, so if I did I apologise...
I have 3 children, all of whicjk were straight A students and sports " stars"  throughout school.
Today they are all average, happy, well adjusted grown-ups.

Reply to Romany
Posted by: Sensible | 2011/07/28

Thank you Prof and Romany. Romany, I don''t have a problem with an average child. The thing is mine was never average since she started school. She''s always been a straight A student. If she is average, that''s fine but I think anyone would be worried if a child drops from 80% in Maths and Science to just 45%. Thanks, anyway, I''m just a concerned parent. I will try not to put pressure on her as Prof suggested.

Reply to Sensible
Posted by: Romany | 2011/07/28

Your daughter is too young to assume that she is brilliant.
She is maybe " a clever little girl" , like every second little girl.
By putting pressure on her to perform you will make her negative.
One can realy only judge a child''s " brilliance"  around Grade 7 or 8.
Yes, there seems to be a problem, but the problem is that she is failing subjects, the problem is not that she is missing " A''s" .
Accept that your little girl is average and then be surprised if she achieves better than average.

Reply to Romany
Posted by: cybershrink | 2011/07/27

Of course you need to discuss this with her teachers. Do I understand you that she started a this new school and did fine in the first term of this year, and markedly worse in the second term ? If so, then it may not be the move per se that has affected her, but maybe something that has changed at the school. Failures in a kid doing well are curious ; 60 % is par for the course - different teachers mark with varying leniency or stringency. Some children are indeed bright, but changes in the curriculum as they move up may mean they face more difficult material, where the methods they learned and relied on before, don't work so well.
The school should be very experienced at understanding such changes and should be able to help you work out what has caused this change, and how to remedy it. Would some temporary extra tutoring help ? Try to avoid her feeling pressure to always be at the top, so that very good but not quite excellent results are felt to be failure.

Reply to cybershrink

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement