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Question
Posted by: Lee | 2009-10-22

MS

My mom has multiple sclerosis, is it hereditery?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberDoc

Hallo Lee
It is not really hereditary but if you have a family member with MS your risk increases from 0.1% to 2 %. (98% chance of not getting it!)
According to http://neurology.health-cares.net/multiple-sclerosis-causes.php
"The risk of developing multiple sclerosis is higher if another family member is affected, suggesting the influence of genetic factors. Thus, a brother, sister, parent, or child of a person with multiple sclerosis stands a one to three-percent chance of developing multiple sclerosis. Similarly, an identical twin runs a 30% chance of acquiring multiple sclerosis whereas a non- identical twin has only a four-percent chance if the other twin has the disease. In addition, the higher prevalence of multiple sclerosis among people of northern European background suggests some genetic susceptibility. The chance increases in families where a first-degree relative has the disease. These statistics suggest that genetic factors play a major role in multiple sclerosis. However, other data suggest that environmental factors also have an important role."
Dr Bets

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cyberdoc | 2009-10-22

Hallo Lee
It is not really hereditary but if you have a family member with MS your risk increases from 0.1% to 2 %. (98% chance of not getting it!)
According to http://neurology.health-cares.net/multiple-sclerosis-causes.php
"The risk of developing multiple sclerosis is higher if another family member is affected, suggesting the influence of genetic factors. Thus, a brother, sister, parent, or child of a person with multiple sclerosis stands a one to three-percent chance of developing multiple sclerosis. Similarly, an identical twin runs a 30% chance of acquiring multiple sclerosis whereas a non- identical twin has only a four-percent chance if the other twin has the disease. In addition, the higher prevalence of multiple sclerosis among people of northern European background suggests some genetic susceptibility. The chance increases in families where a first-degree relative has the disease. These statistics suggest that genetic factors play a major role in multiple sclerosis. However, other data suggest that environmental factors also have an important role."
Dr Bets

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