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Question
Posted by: Simone | 2011-05-19

MRI and Binge Snacking

Hello BM Expert

I do not have funds for expensive therapy, but I need help.
I have a back condition (slipped disk) which I live with, however the neuro does an MRI on me to check the progression. I go ballastic in the MRI (I am 45 so its no joke). The last time they did not sedate me and I had a major panic attack inside. Apparently yelled get me out. Then they tried feet in first (I managed that) but it was unsuccessful technically.Made me try again (I said I did not want to do it). Same thing.Third time I was howling, in a huge state, trying to get off the bed.They sedated me.Towards the end another panic attack came and the Dr. said it is " because you are large"  we gave you the max dose. I''m about 10kg overweight, very tall female. I CANNOT face it again, &  I will have to.Neuro told me its the only way he can see what is going on conclusively. What do I do? Talking to myself, praying, scolding myself, have family there, nothing helps. I think I am totally claustrophobic. Actually I loathe any medical procedure, don''t even want to think about the op that may come to pass.I have drug allergies.A lot of my fear.I''m asthmatic since 18 months old. MRI''s to me equal hell.

I snack after supper. I am trying to force myself not to. I read you have to replace one bad habit with a good one? The snacks are not healthy. Supper is. It is a habit I know. How do I break it?

Thank you
Simone

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageBehaviour modification

Hi Simone
I wish it were as easy as giving you a magic formula. Your fear of confined spaces is a learned response to a situation. The fact that you mentioned asthma is a clue to that. Fears like this are complex and take time to remedy. Until you can get a good couple of sessions in therapy to deal with your reaction to being in the MRI only sedation will really help.
For most people, snacking after dinner is a stress response ted in with emotional eating. Find something to divert your attention. If you typically watch TV after dinner, do something different. How about writing down a couple of goals regarding your health or reading a book?
Generally stay away from the trigger. Alternatively spend some time finding a couple of healthy snacks, such as fruit and fat free yoghurt. Investigate some low calorie desserts you could make, there are tons of resources on the internet.

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Our users say:
Posted by: Behaviour modification | 2011-05-28

Hi Simone
I wish it were as easy as giving you a magic formula. Your fear of confined spaces is a learned response to a situation. The fact that you mentioned asthma is a clue to that. Fears like this are complex and take time to remedy. Until you can get a good couple of sessions in therapy to deal with your reaction to being in the MRI only sedation will really help.
For most people, snacking after dinner is a stress response ted in with emotional eating. Find something to divert your attention. If you typically watch TV after dinner, do something different. How about writing down a couple of goals regarding your health or reading a book?
Generally stay away from the trigger. Alternatively spend some time finding a couple of healthy snacks, such as fruit and fat free yoghurt. Investigate some low calorie desserts you could make, there are tons of resources on the internet.

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