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Question
Posted by: BETH | 2010/11/15

MOTHER AGEING

My mother is 73 yrs old and was diagnosed 4 days ago with macular deterioration. She suddenly changed. Suddenly she can''t even hang up washing. I think it is depression of the situation. My sister and I are confused about how to help her. We know nothing about this. Can she still drive her car? Should she get special care? We are so afraid of handling her with too much care - she will fall into the victim role quickly. Where can we get more help and advise?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

She may be temporarily overwhelmed by the news ( depending on how the diagnosing doctor explained it ) or may have become more lastingly depressed and hopeless. IF her vision is at all impaired, she should probably not drive - but the doctor needs to be asked this, rather urgently. You need to ask him about how bad the vision is now, how rapidly it is likely to decline, and what the medium and long-term outlook is. Sometimes it helps to get someone to help her now, even occasionally, so she is used to trusting them when the vision gets worse.

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2
Our users say:
Posted by: Liza | 2010/11/15

You should go and have a chat with the diagnosing doctor to find out how bad her vision is currently to know what she''s capable of. It''s probably not a good idea for her to drive herself around anymore though.

If she seems to be depressed, she might need to see a psychiatrist and psychologist to help her come to terms with her handicap.

Good Luck
Liza

Reply to Liza
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/11/15

She may be temporarily overwhelmed by the news ( depending on how the diagnosing doctor explained it ) or may have become more lastingly depressed and hopeless. IF her vision is at all impaired, she should probably not drive - but the doctor needs to be asked this, rather urgently. You need to ask him about how bad the vision is now, how rapidly it is likely to decline, and what the medium and long-term outlook is. Sometimes it helps to get someone to help her now, even occasionally, so she is used to trusting them when the vision gets worse.

Reply to cybershrink

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