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Question
Posted by: BRONWEN | 2010/03/30

MIDDLE AND LOWER BACK PAIN

Hi there, I pulled my back three weeks ago playing squash. I have had eight/nine sessions of physio and I still feel very uncomfortable. My physio says that my sacro illiac joint is where the pain is coming from. Previous xrays I have had, mentioned ankylosing spondylosis. Please can you tell me what that is and what do I do to ease my back pain? THank you

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageOsteopath

Hello Bronwen,
A rheumatologist is commonly the type of physician that will diagnose ankylosing spondylitis. A thorough physical exam including x-rays, individual medical history, and a family history of AS, as well as blood work including a test for HLA-B27 are factors in making a diagnosis.
Physical Exam
The overall points taken into account when making an AS diagnosis are:
Onset is usually under 35 years of age.
Pain persists for more than 3 months (i.e. it is chronic).
The back pain and stiffness worsen with immobility, especially at night and early morning.
The back pain and stiffness tend to ease with physical activity and exercise.
Positive response to NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).
A physical examine will entail looking for sites of inflammation. Thus, your doctor will likely check for pain and tenderness along the back, pelvic bones, sacroiliac joints, chest and heels. During the exam, you doctor may also check for the limitation of spinal mobility in all directions and for any restriction of chest expansion.
Other symptoms and indicators are also taken into account including a history of iritis or uveitis (inflammation of the eye), a history of gastrointestinal infections (for example, the presence of Crohn's Disease or ulcerative colitis), a family history of AS, as well as fatigue due to the presence of inflammation.

The hallmark of AS is involvement of the sacroiliac (SI) joint ). The x-rays are supposed to show erosion typical of sacroiliitis. Sacroiliitis is the inflammation of the sacroiliac joints. Using conventional x-rays to detect this involvement can be problematic because it can take 7 to 10 years of disease progression for the changes in the SI joints to be serious enough to show up in conventional x-rays.
If you are looking for a more natural route to manage your back please consult your nearest osteopath. For more information on osteopathy visit www.osteogoodhealth.com

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: Marlise | 2010/05/23

My son has uveitis and severe joint pain. He can not sleep on his left side at night. His right finger is also very swollen. He tested positive for HLBA27 but the MRI rulled out AS? HE also never complains of lower back pain. ???

Reply to Marlise
Posted by: osteopath | 2010/03/30

Hello Bronwen,
A rheumatologist is commonly the type of physician that will diagnose ankylosing spondylitis. A thorough physical exam including x-rays, individual medical history, and a family history of AS, as well as blood work including a test for HLA-B27 are factors in making a diagnosis.
Physical Exam
The overall points taken into account when making an AS diagnosis are:
Onset is usually under 35 years of age.
Pain persists for more than 3 months (i.e. it is chronic).
The back pain and stiffness worsen with immobility, especially at night and early morning.
The back pain and stiffness tend to ease with physical activity and exercise.
Positive response to NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).
A physical examine will entail looking for sites of inflammation. Thus, your doctor will likely check for pain and tenderness along the back, pelvic bones, sacroiliac joints, chest and heels. During the exam, you doctor may also check for the limitation of spinal mobility in all directions and for any restriction of chest expansion.
Other symptoms and indicators are also taken into account including a history of iritis or uveitis (inflammation of the eye), a history of gastrointestinal infections (for example, the presence of Crohn's Disease or ulcerative colitis), a family history of AS, as well as fatigue due to the presence of inflammation.

The hallmark of AS is involvement of the sacroiliac (SI) joint ). The x-rays are supposed to show erosion typical of sacroiliitis. Sacroiliitis is the inflammation of the sacroiliac joints. Using conventional x-rays to detect this involvement can be problematic because it can take 7 to 10 years of disease progression for the changes in the SI joints to be serious enough to show up in conventional x-rays.
If you are looking for a more natural route to manage your back please consult your nearest osteopath. For more information on osteopathy visit www.osteogoodhealth.com

Reply to osteopath

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