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Posted by: fearful | 2011/08/01

me again...

Sorry Proff. I don''t know who else to offload so early in the morning. I had every intention of going to work today but am not - I''ve given in to fear. Im paralyzed  glued to the bed. I feel weak, stupid and pathetic as I have to let me boss know i won''t be in today as well - i was off 4 days last week. The fear of returning to work in a vulnerable state has me all anxious and this is where the fear/phobia sets in. My mind is willing to try but my body is not. Please help.!!!

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Dear O dear, f ! The situation reminds me of the wise comment of President Rooseveldt of america at the time of the Second World War, when he said : "The only thing we have to fear - is fear itself !"
Don't be scared of the fear - it's only anxiety / fear ; it feels bad but it isn't, in itself, dangerous. A major part of the problem with phobic anxiety is the avoidance ; the more we avoid whatever sets off our anxiety, the more fearful and powerful it becomes. And in turn, the more we face those situations and find that even at their very worst, they're never a scrap as frightful as we assumed they would be, the more those fears diminish.
It often helps, in a sense, to ignore one's mind - I mean, when one is sure there is no good basis for feeling so anxious ( so I don't recommend actually entering the lion's den or doing any foolishly genuinely dangerous thing ) then facing one's fears by DOING the necessary ( like going to work ) rather than basing the decision on how anxious one feels, or waitying until one doesn't feel anxious ) often workd - your emotions can then catch up with your behaviour.
Acting AS THOUGH you were brave, may help you to discover that you're much braver than you thought. In the same way, people who act as though they really enjoyed broccoli and eat it, find they start actually liking the stuff.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2011/08/01

Dear O dear, f ! The situation reminds me of the wise comment of President Rooseveldt of america at the time of the Second World War, when he said : "The only thing we have to fear - is fear itself !"
Don't be scared of the fear - it's only anxiety / fear ; it feels bad but it isn't, in itself, dangerous. A major part of the problem with phobic anxiety is the avoidance ; the more we avoid whatever sets off our anxiety, the more fearful and powerful it becomes. And in turn, the more we face those situations and find that even at their very worst, they're never a scrap as frightful as we assumed they would be, the more those fears diminish.
It often helps, in a sense, to ignore one's mind - I mean, when one is sure there is no good basis for feeling so anxious ( so I don't recommend actually entering the lion's den or doing any foolishly genuinely dangerous thing ) then facing one's fears by DOING the necessary ( like going to work ) rather than basing the decision on how anxious one feels, or waitying until one doesn't feel anxious ) often workd - your emotions can then catch up with your behaviour.
Acting AS THOUGH you were brave, may help you to discover that you're much braver than you thought. In the same way, people who act as though they really enjoyed broccoli and eat it, find they start actually liking the stuff.

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