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Question
Posted by: Q | 2010/06/14

love

So what should a therapit do if he develops strong feelings for a client? I would rather not talk about what happened. I don''t know what you would call my kind of therapy - only been about six months and dealing with family and divorce issues. Who scolded you for being against psychanalysis, surely you can have your own opinion? Thanks Doc

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

I really am reluctant to get into another detailed and logn discussion of this sort of issue, especially as I was scolded by our Editor for expressing my extreme scepticism about psychoanalysis in the last discussion. Apparently a small group of psychoanalysts took exception to my views.
And, not knowing the details, there's not much basis for me to comment.
IF a therapist develops strong feelings for a paient, he/she should discuss this professionally with the patient, and if he/she is not able to handle it in the recommended ways, he should refer the patient to a different therapist to continue therapy, withdrawing if he/she is losing his/her objectivity and neutrality.
I think the complaining analysts, if I remember properly, said that within their group, it was usual for them to have Supervision, a wise process in which the individual psychotherapist/ analysts meets regularly, perhaps once a week, with another one or more colleagues, to discuss his/her cases and to be able to discuss such issues as they arise and het advice on how best to deal with them. I think that is an excellent procedure, but it seems to be really uncommon these days.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/06/15

I really am reluctant to get into another detailed and logn discussion of this sort of issue, especially as I was scolded by our Editor for expressing my extreme scepticism about psychoanalysis in the last discussion. Apparently a small group of psychoanalysts took exception to my views.
And, not knowing the details, there's not much basis for me to comment.
IF a therapist develops strong feelings for a paient, he/she should discuss this professionally with the patient, and if he/she is not able to handle it in the recommended ways, he should refer the patient to a different therapist to continue therapy, withdrawing if he/she is losing his/her objectivity and neutrality.
I think the complaining analysts, if I remember properly, said that within their group, it was usual for them to have Supervision, a wise process in which the individual psychotherapist/ analysts meets regularly, perhaps once a week, with another one or more colleagues, to discuss his/her cases and to be able to discuss such issues as they arise and het advice on how best to deal with them. I think that is an excellent procedure, but it seems to be really uncommon these days.

Reply to cybershrink
Posted by: anon | 2010/06/14

Hi Q
You would need to expand on why you think your therapist has these feelings? Outside/inside therapy? If I remember correctly the girl/woman that debated with CS said something about her therapist and emails. Somthing about her therapist emailing her at night asking for a push or something. Now that doesnt sound too great to me then again there may be a context for it. You need to be a little more specific.

Reply to anon

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