advertisement
Question
Posted by: ????? | 2010-05-18

life policy

My father -in-law held a meeting with his children, my husband is one of them and told them that he has a life policy and that he can''t afford to pay it anymore and that his been paying for long time and don''t want it to lapse. Blah blah blah! So he ask them (all three his children) who was interested in continuing to pay this policy on the one condition the one that is paying will be the sole beneficiary. The others said no they could not afford it and he then ask/persuade my husband to help with the paying of the policy. So it has been four months and my husband still has not received anthing (documents) confirming that he is know the only beneficiary and for four months he has been paying the monthly premium for this policy. His father is still the policy holder and my concern is that he is just (mis-)using his son (my huband) so that someone else can actually benefit from this (his new wife). What rights does my husband have in this case.

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageFamily law expert

He should ask for proof of the cession or amendment where it is stated that he is the sole beneficiary of the policy. Without that, the payout of the policy will fall into his dad's estate and then be dealt with in terms of his will or intestate if there is no such will.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: family law expert | 2010-05-22

He should ask for proof of the cession or amendment where it is stated that he is the sole beneficiary of the policy. Without that, the payout of the policy will fall into his dad's estate and then be dealt with in terms of his will or intestate if there is no such will.

Reply to family law expert

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement