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Question
Posted by: tf | 2012/06/09

laser lipo

dear doc,
I have been given a 6 session laser treatment to get rid of cellulite. Does this actually work without surgery or is it just a gimmick? If it does work are there any negative effects? Is it safe?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageAnti-ageing expert

Hi TF, thank you for the question.
If I am not mistaken you are referring to the treatment that requires pads to be placed on the areas of concern so that a low level laser energy may be passed into the treatment areas. As far as I am aware there is no harm in trying this machine but I am not aware of any independent medical studies that demonstrate the exact degree of effectiveness. There are some studies that are demonstrating improvement of cellulite and even fat reduction using low level laser energies but further studies are required to find the exact wavelength to achieve the best results.

Cellulite is difficult to treat:

Cellulite is a term used to describe the dimpled appearance of skin caused by fat deposits that are just below the surface of the skin. It generally appears on skin in the abdomen, lower limbs, and pelvic region, and it usually occurs after puberty. Cellulite is also known as adiposis edematosa, dermopanniculosis deformans, status protrusus cutis, and gynoid lipodystrophy in the medical field and as orange peel syndrome, cottage cheese skin, hail damage, and the mattress phenomenon in colloquial language.

Cellulite is often classified using three grades. Grade 1 classification sees no clinical symptoms, but a microscopic examination of cells from the area detects underlying anatomical changes. Grade 2 cellulite requires the skin to show pallor (pastiness), be lower temperature, and have decreased elasticity in addition to anatomical changes noted by microscopic examinations. Grade 3 cellulite has visible roughness of the skin (like an orange peel) along with all grade 2 signs. Cellulite occurs in both men and women, but it is much more common in women because they are more likely to have particular types of fat and connective tissue.

The causes of cellulite are not well understood, but there are several theories that have been put forth as explanations. Among these are:
Hormonal factors - hormones likely play an important role in cellulite development. Many believe estrogen, insulin, noradrenaline, thyroid hormones, and prolactin are part of the cellulite production process.
Genetics - certain genes are required for cellulite development. Genes may predispose an individual to particular characteristics associated with cellulite, such as gender, race, slow metabolism, distribution of fat just underneath the skin, and circulatory insufficiency.
Diet - people who eat too much fat, carbohydrates, or salt and too little fiber are likely to have greater amounts of cellulite.
Lifestyle factors - cellulite may be more prevalent in smokers, those who do not exercise, and those who sit or stand in one position for long periods of time.
Clothing - underwear with tight elastic across the buttocks (limiting blood flow) may contribute to the formation of cellulite.

There are several therapies that have been suggested to remove cellulite, but none have been supported in the scientific or medical literature.

Therapeutic methods that are physical or mechanical include pneumatic massages, massages that stimulate lymphatic flow, heat therapy, ultrasound, radio frequency therapy, magnetic therapy, radial waves therapy, Endermologie, and electrical stimulation.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: anti-ageing expert | 2012/06/17

Hi TF, thank you for the question.
If I am not mistaken you are referring to the treatment that requires pads to be placed on the areas of concern so that a low level laser energy may be passed into the treatment areas. As far as I am aware there is no harm in trying this machine but I am not aware of any independent medical studies that demonstrate the exact degree of effectiveness. There are some studies that are demonstrating improvement of cellulite and even fat reduction using low level laser energies but further studies are required to find the exact wavelength to achieve the best results.

Cellulite is difficult to treat:

Cellulite is a term used to describe the dimpled appearance of skin caused by fat deposits that are just below the surface of the skin. It generally appears on skin in the abdomen, lower limbs, and pelvic region, and it usually occurs after puberty. Cellulite is also known as adiposis edematosa, dermopanniculosis deformans, status protrusus cutis, and gynoid lipodystrophy in the medical field and as orange peel syndrome, cottage cheese skin, hail damage, and the mattress phenomenon in colloquial language.

Cellulite is often classified using three grades. Grade 1 classification sees no clinical symptoms, but a microscopic examination of cells from the area detects underlying anatomical changes. Grade 2 cellulite requires the skin to show pallor (pastiness), be lower temperature, and have decreased elasticity in addition to anatomical changes noted by microscopic examinations. Grade 3 cellulite has visible roughness of the skin (like an orange peel) along with all grade 2 signs. Cellulite occurs in both men and women, but it is much more common in women because they are more likely to have particular types of fat and connective tissue.

The causes of cellulite are not well understood, but there are several theories that have been put forth as explanations. Among these are:
Hormonal factors - hormones likely play an important role in cellulite development. Many believe estrogen, insulin, noradrenaline, thyroid hormones, and prolactin are part of the cellulite production process.
Genetics - certain genes are required for cellulite development. Genes may predispose an individual to particular characteristics associated with cellulite, such as gender, race, slow metabolism, distribution of fat just underneath the skin, and circulatory insufficiency.
Diet - people who eat too much fat, carbohydrates, or salt and too little fiber are likely to have greater amounts of cellulite.
Lifestyle factors - cellulite may be more prevalent in smokers, those who do not exercise, and those who sit or stand in one position for long periods of time.
Clothing - underwear with tight elastic across the buttocks (limiting blood flow) may contribute to the formation of cellulite.

There are several therapies that have been suggested to remove cellulite, but none have been supported in the scientific or medical literature.

Therapeutic methods that are physical or mechanical include pneumatic massages, massages that stimulate lymphatic flow, heat therapy, ultrasound, radio frequency therapy, magnetic therapy, radial waves therapy, Endermologie, and electrical stimulation.

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