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Question
Posted by: R | 2012/09/06

Kids- Frozen vegetables

Hi Doc, Hope you are well.
I am a working mum of 2, a 5 yr old and 9 month old baby.
Since I put baby on solids I almost always cook his food myself, fresh vegetables and have lately introduced meat and basmati rice. Can you please advise if cooking frozen vegetables is nutritious enough for a growing baby? (and for the 5yr old)
Often it is just a matter of convenience having bought frozen veggies in the freezer, or when I run out of fresh veggies and can''t make it to the supermarket.
Also you mention the average weight for a 2 yr old boy is 10 kg. My baby already weighs 10 kg, should I be concerned?
I am sure he will start losing weight when he gets more mobile though. He is otherwise healthy, although did have the colds on and off during winter and being at creche.

Also the 5 yr old has an affinity to meat and chicken, but loves his veggies and rice. What other protein can I include in his diet to ensure he has what he needs as he grows?

Thanking yoiu in advance - R

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageDietDoc

Dear R
As you know, it is best to buy fresh vegetables and fruit and to prepare small quantities for young children to ensure that they obtain the maximum nutrient value. However, frozen vegetables can be used for young children in the type of situations you list - when you have not had time to purchase fresh vegetables because of your work, etc. Just don't rely on frozen vegetables all the time. As regards the weight of young children, it is important to remember that the international tables only list average weights and that both the weight and height of an individual child can vary greatly depending on factors such as genetics, level of activity, previous illnesses or current conditions, prematurity at birth, etc. Most Moms can tell if their children are overweight or not. If you are worried about your 2-year-old, then please have him and his weight assessed by your gp. The following foods are rich sources of high quality protein: meat, poultry, fish, eggs, milk, yoghurt, cottage cheese and other cheeses. Legumes such as cooked or canned dry beans, peas, lentils and soya are also good sources of protein and can be combined with meat, fish, eggs, or cheese to supplement a child's protein intake.
Best regards
DietDoc

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Our users say:
Posted by: kcee | 2013/02/07

please advise on the positive or negative impacts of drinking the chinese tea when you are hiv positive. Will it be wise to take it as a method of detoxing/ constipating? Yes i am taking my meds as prescibed just worried that if i do, somehow the meds can be washed out from system which might lead to weaken my immune, please advise before i start with taking the tea.

Reply to kcee
Posted by: DietDoc | 2012/09/07

Dear R
As you know, it is best to buy fresh vegetables and fruit and to prepare small quantities for young children to ensure that they obtain the maximum nutrient value. However, frozen vegetables can be used for young children in the type of situations you list - when you have not had time to purchase fresh vegetables because of your work, etc. Just don't rely on frozen vegetables all the time. As regards the weight of young children, it is important to remember that the international tables only list average weights and that both the weight and height of an individual child can vary greatly depending on factors such as genetics, level of activity, previous illnesses or current conditions, prematurity at birth, etc. Most Moms can tell if their children are overweight or not. If you are worried about your 2-year-old, then please have him and his weight assessed by your gp. The following foods are rich sources of high quality protein: meat, poultry, fish, eggs, milk, yoghurt, cottage cheese and other cheeses. Legumes such as cooked or canned dry beans, peas, lentils and soya are also good sources of protein and can be combined with meat, fish, eggs, or cheese to supplement a child's protein intake.
Best regards
DietDoc

Reply to DietDoc

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