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Question
Posted by: M | 2010/03/01

Just Life

CS. If I had the energy to visit a Dr now, I am pretty sure that I would be diagnosed with depression. My question is this: Without therapy, I am going to assume that healing doesnt happen fast, if at all? That is  only using drugs to alter the chemical imbalances? Do you need both? I have tried to get into a better state of mind for three years, actually closer to four. Does everyone find life a bit on the hard side? If all is well with the mind &  emotions, then I assume you dont feel as if the potholes and the poor people next to the side of the road is the end of the world? I have seen counsilllors &  I have been on a mild anti-depressant after baby no.2. It is so frustrating that I am not happy. Are there any really happy people out there? I am not even sure that a terapist will be able to help.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

There were studies to look at how long Depression lasts when untreated, and it tends to be 9 months to a year, or longer. Unpleasant and risky to leave it untreated. Treatment is intended to improve on the duration, the unpleasantness, and the safety. AD drugs are useful, as is a specific form of counselling, CBT, Cognitive-behaviour Therapy. And recent research shows that BOTH tend to change the chemical imbalances in the most useful way, and over around the same time-scale, too.
I suppose most people do, indeed, find life "a bit on the hard side", but Depression is of course much more than that. Depression is also quite common after giving birth, as Post-Natal Depression.
Generally, only CBT counselling has been shown to have notable benefits. And there's really no such thing as a >mild antidepressant", though often GPs seem to use this term. Every AD must be uswed at its proper dose to have a chance to work, otherwise you have all the expense and side-effects without a real chance of benefits. If the situation is at all complex, one should be seeing a psychiatrist, at least for the initial diagnostic assessment, discussion, and treatment recommendations

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/03/01

There were studies to look at how long Depression lasts when untreated, and it tends to be 9 months to a year, or longer. Unpleasant and risky to leave it untreated. Treatment is intended to improve on the duration, the unpleasantness, and the safety. AD drugs are useful, as is a specific form of counselling, CBT, Cognitive-behaviour Therapy. And recent research shows that BOTH tend to change the chemical imbalances in the most useful way, and over around the same time-scale, too.
I suppose most people do, indeed, find life "a bit on the hard side", but Depression is of course much more than that. Depression is also quite common after giving birth, as Post-Natal Depression.
Generally, only CBT counselling has been shown to have notable benefits. And there's really no such thing as a >mild antidepressant", though often GPs seem to use this term. Every AD must be uswed at its proper dose to have a chance to work, otherwise you have all the expense and side-effects without a real chance of benefits. If the situation is at all complex, one should be seeing a psychiatrist, at least for the initial diagnostic assessment, discussion, and treatment recommendations

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