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Question
Posted by: Anon | 2008/08/11

Is this weird or normal?

Dear CS

I' ve been sleeping with a blankie for the past 30 years. Got it when I was 7, and went to my sis' es creche for afterschool. I am now 37. My husband is getting increasingly annoyed with it, and says it will mentally scar our son. When we got married I told him I was ready to let go of the blankie, but he said I could keep it. I am well-educated (PhD) and normal and not really eccentric. What do you think?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

A genuine Security Blanket ! A bad habit, and maybe indicating that you still feel inappropriately insecure. 7 is very old to START such a habit, which generally belongs to a much earlier area of life. I'm not at all surprised your husband finds it bothersome, though I don't see why it should in any way harm your son.
Interesting and relevant response from JOhn. Yes, do see a counsellor to clarify what insecurities and what assumptions you are clinging to along with the blanky, so you can move further into secure adulthood.

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Our users say:
Posted by: Anon | 2008/08/11

Thanks John, I liked your answer - very eloquently put.

Thanks CS, I hear what you' re saying. Finances not making visits to my therapist possible right now. Also a bit loathe to embark on such an endeavour with new baby due in Jan. Maybe after that. As long as our son won' t be harmed, I' m ok with it. Will try and explain to husband.

Reply to Anon
Posted by: John | 2008/08/11

Object attachment in adulthood is rare. In children, it is usually associated with security issues, or insecurity issues? I am reminded of the the pictures of Madelaine' s mother when she (Madiie) disappeared and she (the mother) always appeared in public cluthcing a Teddy Bear belonging to the child. At first this aroused feelings of great pity and empathy but afterwards it looked like a publicity stunt. In any event, her need to lug this pathetic Teddy (how' s that for a transferrred epithet?) was short-lived and associated with an event, unlike your attachment. You would be advised to visit a shrink to help you beciome independent of the balnket, should you feel the need to. It is not not be confused with superstition, where one might set great store upon an inanimate object as one feels it brings good luck.

Reply to John
Posted by: Anon | 2008/08/11

Which are???

Reply to Anon
Posted by: John | 2008/08/11

Ah, thank you. You' ve confirmed my initial assumptions.

Reply to John
Posted by: Anon | 2008/08/11

John, I have a PhD in Cell Biology. With not really eccentric I mean that I don' t dress funny, but I believe in ghosts.

Reply to Anon
Posted by: John | 2008/08/11

What do you have a PhD in, Linus, and what do you mean by " ...not really eccentric.." ?

Reply to John
Posted by: Anon | 2008/08/11

I dunno. I think my husband is afraid our son will also become so attached to his comforter. We have a second son on the way, so he' s getting even more itchy about it.

Reply to Anon
Posted by: Garfield | 2008/08/11

Why is your husband getting annoyed with you sleeping with a particular blanket? And how on earth could this ' mentally scar'  your son?

Reply to Garfield

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