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Question
Posted by: Sad | 2010/07/28

Q.

is it cruel to keep my blind dog alive?

My pug has been blind for 3 years now. She''ll be 10 years old in November. She has coped well so far,but a few months ago the started to wee and phoo in the house,so now she''s kept outside. if let her in the house,she''s pooh withing 2 minute.
Why is this?
Many people have told me that i''m being cruel for keeping her alive and that shoulp put her to sleep.
Are they right and me wrong?
just feel that i still look after her well and she has a good life. i clean het kennel reguraly and she gets fresh food and water every day. Her kenner has carperts in and a soft warm blanket.

Expert's Reply

A.

Expert ImageCyberVet

Hi Sad

You know your dog better than anyone so you are the only person who really knows if your dog is suffering in the home environment. The most important thing is that the dog has a fulfilling and quality life.

It sound like she may have urinary and faecal incontinence and this reduced control is sometimes apparent in geriatric animals
Incontinent dogs should be carefully examined by a vet to determine whether the problem is due to old age (lack of sphincter control) or a condition that can be treated. Urinary incontinence could be caused by conditions of the bladder and urethra. A relatively common cause in older spayed female dogs is reduced oestrogen levels. This type of condition may respond well to hormone treatments.
Faecal incontinence has been associated with damaged anal sphincter muscles, which perhaps can be surgically repaired, or injuries to the lumbar or pelvic area, with results from a nerve damage. Nerve disorders usually are difficult to treat. Where loose stools associated with improper feeding are a part of the problem, dietary adjustments may be helpful.
Measures can be taken with some minor adjustments may make things easier for you and your dog in this situation.

I hope this can help

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

6
user comments

C.

Posted by: f | 2010/07/29

she then can sleep inside at night

Reply to f
Posted by: f | 2010/07/29

there is nappies available for dogs...look at this www(dot)moyapetbotique(dot)co(dot)za

Reply to f
Posted by: Chill | 2010/07/28

If your dog is otherwise happy and healthy then it is absolutely not cruel to ''keep her alive'' when she''s blind. It would be cruel to keep her in a hostile environment, or without proper shelter and care, but this is absolutely not the case, judging from your description.

If you think about it: the reason we regard going blind as tragic is because of the implications for humans, as well as the fact that we KNOW we will never see again, can''t read, can''t watch tv, can''t drive etc. But dogs don''t think like we do - all they know about is here and now, and as far as your dog is concerned, it''s just pretty dark right now. They don''t know about tomorrow, or next week, or next year.

I''ve had a dog that went both deaf and blind during the last couple of years of her life, and one of my current dogs, who is well over 16, is going the same way. But both are/were perfectly happy, pottering about - both had/have healthy appetites, and warm beds, and loads of care and attention. In short - a serene old age, and there''s no way I will deny my dogs this, provided I''m able to care for them.

Good luck with your pooch, and don''t let people who haven''t given it any thought upset you by telling you you''re being cruel. They don''t have a clue.

Reply to Chill
Posted by: Sad | 2010/07/28

She''s not unhappy houtside. She''s been sleeping outside in her kennel with the other sodag at ninght and during the day my dogs can roam free inside and outside the house as they please. ''m home all day. But the last few months it were better to keep het ouside since she has week bladder controle and phoo''s in the house. She has a lovely ,warm under roof kennel with carpets and soft ,clewan blankets inside the kennel. And she doesn''t moan to come in the house. She''s content with staying outside. ''m a animal lover and will never be cruel.

How did she become blind? Wel.he owned a bull dog and she and the bulldog didn''t get along. When pugs bet over excited their eyes can pop out. Well,her''s did. The vet could safe the eyes but not het sight. So,she were blind after that.

i take her for vet checks regurly and the vet are very happy with her health. Other than het being blind,she''s happy and healthy.

Reply to Sad
Posted by: Steph | 2010/07/28

I understand that its a tricky dilemma to keep your dog inside, but please understand the difficulty in being a dog outside alone at night and being blind. i cannot imagine that this transition was an easy one for your little pug after being a house dog to suddenly being outside, as well as being blind. can you not just keep an eye on her when she is inside?

i have a dog with congestive heart failure and as such is on diuretic treatment so he wees a lot, but i manage to keep mishaps at by for the most part as i am sure to watch him and take him out at regular intervals.

on another note, why is your pug blind? what caused the blindness, has she been seen by a vet? my dog is 15 with heart disease and he''s still running around like a trooper, so perhaps there is an underlying issue with your little dog?

Reply to Steph
Posted by: CyberVet | 2010/07/28

Hi Sad

You know your dog better than anyone so you are the only person who really knows if your dog is suffering in the home environment. The most important thing is that the dog has a fulfilling and quality life.

It sound like she may have urinary and faecal incontinence and this reduced control is sometimes apparent in geriatric animals
Incontinent dogs should be carefully examined by a vet to determine whether the problem is due to old age (lack of sphincter control) or a condition that can be treated. Urinary incontinence could be caused by conditions of the bladder and urethra. A relatively common cause in older spayed female dogs is reduced oestrogen levels. This type of condition may respond well to hormone treatments.
Faecal incontinence has been associated with damaged anal sphincter muscles, which perhaps can be surgically repaired, or injuries to the lumbar or pelvic area, with results from a nerve damage. Nerve disorders usually are difficult to treat. Where loose stools associated with improper feeding are a part of the problem, dietary adjustments may be helpful.
Measures can be taken with some minor adjustments may make things easier for you and your dog in this situation.

I hope this can help

Reply to CyberVet

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