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Question
Posted by: Liané  van Zyl | 2011/04/04

HUUUUUNGRY!!

goodafternoon!

i am a pretty active 31 year old female (bloodgroup O pos for what it''s worth). my problem is that i''m trying to lose the pesky 6kgs that i''ve gained in the past 4 years but i am really struggling.

i dance twice a week, go to gym at least 3 times a week and run 3 times a week. but i keep fluctuating between 73 &  76kg (i''d really REALLY like to weigh in the 60s again)

my problem is that i am pretty much hungry all the time. i try to eat more vegetables than carbohydrates but they just don''t fill me up. and i struggle to afford proteins. i rarely if ever eat red meat. my usual day will consist of:

breakfast:
2 x muesli rusks
cup yoghurt &  weighless muesli

lunch:
i''ll make a tuna salad, eat it and my stomach will be grumbling again in an hour so then i''ll order a sandwich as well :(

supper:
baked potato &  salad

i''m not fond of cooking because i leave home at 6 in the morning and usually only arrive back late.

i''ve been told i''m aneamic (my iron level is 11.6 at the moment) so i don''t know if this has anything to do with it. i am taking an iron supplement and i eat raw spinach in my salad.

what can i eat that isn''t calorie rich but filling at the same time?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageDietDoc

Dear Liane
I can't figure out if you are overweight or not (despite those 4 kg) because you did not provide me with your height in metres so that I can calculate your BMI. However, anyone who does as much exercise as you do, is probably not overweight and you need carbohydrates to sustain your hectic exercise schedule. Carbohydrates are our best fuel for physical activity and to prevent hunger pangs and cravings. Carbs only provide 16 kJ of energy per gram, so they are not fattening. It is the fat we add to carbs, which adds 37 kJ per gram of fat, to our food. So I would recommend that you eat high-fibre, and low glycaemic index (GI) carbs at each meal to provide your with energy to sustain your exercise programme. Try using a low-fat, high-fibre diet (click on 'DietnFood' at the top of this page, then on 'Healthy Diets' and then on 'Slimming Diet' for a copy of such a diet) to boost your carb intake. Now about the iron-deficiency anaemia, here you really do need to make a plan to eat 1-2 portions of lean red meat per week, more fish, at least 4 eggs (boil a few ahead of time and add to your breakfast or lunch) per week, and iron-fortified breakfast cereals every day (check on the labels of your Weighless muesli to see if it has added iron - the rusks probably won't). Spinach does contain iron, but it is not available to the body because it is bound by compounds called phytates so your body won't absorb much iron from spinach. The iron in meat, fish, eggs and iron-fortified cereals is much more easily absorbed by the body and will help you recover from the iron-deficiency anaemia. Make a plan to eat some red meat at least 1-2 times a week, otherwise you will be exhausted all the time due to the anaemia.
Take good care
DietDoc

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

4
Our users say:
Posted by: Kaandra | 2011/04/04

No worries, glad to help. Maybe also invest in a good multi vitamin I take biostrath which is awesome.

For years I made the same mistake trying to focus on protein and cut out carbs and my body was never satisfied. Give your body what it needs but the healther and better options out there.

Good luck and please let us know how your progress is going.

If you want to be a bit more adventures brown rice mixed with yellow, green, red peppers and onion, mushroom and spinash is also very filling and nice., you can also add your tuna in there.

and then you have the left overs of green pepper, spinash and mushroom for your boiled eggs or omelette.

Reply to Kaandra
Posted by: Liané  van Zyl | 2011/04/04

thank you so much Kasandra!!! i am definitely going to give this a shot :)

Reply to Lian&#233  van Zyl
Posted by: Kasandra | 2011/04/04

Hi There
Focus on foods that will keep you fuller for longer. I find that Rye Bread (toasted) with hummus, peanutbutter or egg / avo keeps me full for long. No butter.

Carbs arent the enemy, its which carbs you focus on that can be the problem.

Try as a snack banana with low fat yogurt or rice cakes / provita with cottage cheese and low fat veggie soup.

Ps at Pick and Pay Tuna cans are now R5.99 and chicken breasts are also not too expensive.

Lunch : Tuna Salad is fine but add some whole wheat durem pasta into your salad.

Dinner : maybe slice of rye toast with egg and some tomato and spinach at night. Boil the eggs and keep ready in fridge for when you get back home.

Try to eat an apple in between meals and banana.

GOOD LUCK!

Reply to Kasandra
Posted by: DietDoc | 2011/04/04

Dear Liane
I can't figure out if you are overweight or not (despite those 4 kg) because you did not provide me with your height in metres so that I can calculate your BMI. However, anyone who does as much exercise as you do, is probably not overweight and you need carbohydrates to sustain your hectic exercise schedule. Carbohydrates are our best fuel for physical activity and to prevent hunger pangs and cravings. Carbs only provide 16 kJ of energy per gram, so they are not fattening. It is the fat we add to carbs, which adds 37 kJ per gram of fat, to our food. So I would recommend that you eat high-fibre, and low glycaemic index (GI) carbs at each meal to provide your with energy to sustain your exercise programme. Try using a low-fat, high-fibre diet (click on 'DietnFood' at the top of this page, then on 'Healthy Diets' and then on 'Slimming Diet' for a copy of such a diet) to boost your carb intake. Now about the iron-deficiency anaemia, here you really do need to make a plan to eat 1-2 portions of lean red meat per week, more fish, at least 4 eggs (boil a few ahead of time and add to your breakfast or lunch) per week, and iron-fortified breakfast cereals every day (check on the labels of your Weighless muesli to see if it has added iron - the rusks probably won't). Spinach does contain iron, but it is not available to the body because it is bound by compounds called phytates so your body won't absorb much iron from spinach. The iron in meat, fish, eggs and iron-fortified cereals is much more easily absorbed by the body and will help you recover from the iron-deficiency anaemia. Make a plan to eat some red meat at least 1-2 times a week, otherwise you will be exhausted all the time due to the anaemia.
Take good care
DietDoc

Reply to DietDoc

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